Whistl trialing the first electric Renault Trucks Master ZE

Whistl trialing the first electric Renault Trucks Master ZE

Whistl trialling the first electric Renault Trucks Master ZE to be licensed on UK roads

Delivery management company Whistl has announced that it is trialling the first electric Renault Trucks Master ZE to be licensed on UK roads.

The all-electric 3.1 tonne van has a range of around 100 miles (160km) and is being trialled in Belfast, Northern Ireland, by Whistl on day-to-day operations, collecting business mail and parcels.

Working with Renault, Whistl is looking at ways of reducing emissions across its 400 strong fleet of vans and HGVs and is keen to embrace new technology to enable it to reach its goal of a sustainable transport strategy.

Phil Brown, depot manager at Belfast, said, “The vehicle is a revelation and the drivers love it. It is quiet yet the acceleration is immediate and driving it is no different from a normal van. The emissions are zero and the anticipated cost of running it are so much lower than traditional diesel.”

Baz Barrett, Whistl’s national fleet and compliance manager, added, “It is vital that we as a business continue to look at new technologies and adapt our fleet in this way. We already have an excellent relationship with BRS/Renault Trucks and so when we knew this 100% electric vehicle was coming to market, we wanted to see how we could integrate it into our fleet in core urban areas. From the feedback so far, it works really well and there is great scope to introduce it into our fleet now to enable us to reduce our carbon and NOx footprint.”

Graham Neagus, head of LCV on behalf of BRS and Renault, said, “Renault Trucks and BRS are delighted to be working with Whistl to help them enter the world of electromobility with the new Renault Trucks Master ZE.

“This vehicle is available in a wide range of styles, is ideal for parcel deliveries carrying over 1,000kg [2,200 lb] payload, and is able to cover 100 miles [160km] per charge – and all with zero emissions.

“Our clients in cities across Europe are placing orders now for the Master ZE, which is one of three full-electric products from Renault Trucks, including both 16 and 26 tonne rigid HGVs.”

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Tories pledge ‘green’ funding for electric cars and new forests

Tories pledge ‘green’ funding for electric cars and new forests

Tories pledge ‘green’ funding for electric cars and new forests

Ministers say the measures will help achieve the target of making the UK carbon neutral by 2050.

The Government is promising to invest up to £1 billion in developing electric cars while planting a million new trees as part of a package to help make the UK carbon neutral by 2050.

On the eve of the Conservative Party Conference in Manchester, ministers said the measures were the latest step towards delivering a science-led “net zero” in line with the recommendations of the Committee on Climate Change.

They include the creation of a new fund to invest up to £1 billion over five years to boost the production of key “green” technologies in the motor industry, including batteries, electric motors, power electronics and hydrogen fuel cells.

Minsters said that as well as helping to achieve the 2050 net zero target, they would create hundreds of thousands of high-skilled, high paid jobs.
Business Secretary Andrea Leadsom says the measures will reduce emissions while creating low carbon jobs (Jonathan Brady/PA)

At the same time, the Government is promising to establish a new Great Northumberland Forest, as well as creating more green spaces across the UK.
It will begin with the planting of three new forests in Northumberland, with up to a million trees between 2020 and 2024, reducing damaging carbon emissions while improving biodiversity.

Ministers are also pledging to support a programme to develop new “pocket parks” – while regenerating existing ones – on small pieces of derelict or undeveloped land in urban areas.

In other measures, the Government is committing £200 million to the initial development phase of the planned nuclear fusion power station which offers the prospect of limitless electrical power with minimal waste from 2040.

The Government has also said it is introducing new home-building standards, improving energy efficiency and reducing emissions from 2025.
Business Secretary Andrea Leadsom said: “Addressing climate change is a top priority for the Conservative Party, and today’s announcements will not only help us reach our net zero 2050 target, but will benefit communities and households – and improve wildlife and well-being – while doing so.
“The Conservatives are doing this properly: creating hundreds of thousands of low carbon jobs and growing our economy while successfully reducing emissions.”

Environment Secretary Theresa Villiers added: “The planting of one million trees will be fundamental in our commitment to be the first generation to leave the natural environment in a better state than we found it.

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Mayor sets out plans for London’s electric vehicle future

Mayor sets out plans for London’s electric vehicle future

Epansion plans for London’s electric vehicle (EV) charging network

The mayor of London, as set out his plans for a major expansion of London’s electric vehicle (EV) charging network to ensure the capital continues to be one of the world’s leading zero-emission cities.

London’s plan follows the mayor’s establishment of the world’s first electric vehicle infrastructure taskforce, bringing together representatives from business, energy, infrastructure, government and the London boroughs. The past year has seen more than 140 organisations contribute to the work of the taskforce.

The new plan estimates the number of EV charge points required in the next five years, based on different scenarios for the growth of electric vehicles and looks at how this can be delivered with less public subsidy and without installing points which are underused or outdated.

The taskforce and other industry partners will support the mayor in driving forward a number of initiatives in the plan including:

  • Installing the next generation of ultra-rapid charging points at London petrol stations later this year.
  • Delivering five flagship charging hubs, with the ability for multiple cars to quickly be charged in one place. The first of these hubs will be operational in the heart of the Square Mile by the end of the year.
  • A new ‘one-stop-shop’ for Londoners to request new charging infrastructure from their local authority in areas of high demand led by London councils, making it easier for drivers to switch to electric vehicles.
  • Expanding electric car clubs and bringing more vehicles to market, offering greater choice to Londoners and businesses.
  • New online smart tools to ensure London’s energy grid continues to keep pace with demand and to help unlock private sector investment.

Speaking at the launch of the London EV Infrastructure Delivery Plan at the Institution of Engineering and Technology today, mayor of London, Sadiq Khan said: “We need to reject the fossil fuels of the past and embrace an electric revolution in London’s transport. To truly transform the quality of our air and to tackle the climate crisis London must move away from petrol and diesel cars, with their catastrophic impact on the environment, and towards zero- emission vehicles.

“I want London to lead the world in this ambition, with all new cars and vans on London roads to meeting these standards by 2030, not 2040 as the government is proposing. To make this vision a reality we must make sure all Londoners have access to the essential infrastructure required to run and maintain an electric vehicle. This is a massive operation and can only be achieved if the public and private sector come together to deliver London’s electric future.”

National Infrastructure Commission chair, Sir John Armitt, said: “A zero-emission van and rapid-charging network will be welcomed by London’s drivers and highlights the importance of electric vehicles to improving air quality in our cities and reducing the impact of the growth in urban freight. But more action will needed – such as the ban on new diesel HGV sales by 2040 we recommended in our recent report on freight and reinforcing the electricity network – if we’re to meet the UK’s climate change targets and clean up the air in London and other cities. The government should charge Up Britain by committing to a truly national rapid charging network and give cities new powers over transport so they can follow London’s example.”

The plan outlines how London is on track to deliver the necessary infrastructure for a radical growth in electric vehicles, which estimates show could increase from around 20,000 today to over 330,000 by 2025.

Electric Vehicles and Rapid Charging

Zero emission capable (ZEC) vehicles have environmental and financial benefits, and will help London become a zero carbon city by 2050. We are working with partners to develop a network to help you charge them quickly and efficiently.

 

We need to clean up London’s air and rid the Capital of the most polluting vehicles. The Mayor has an ambition to make London’s transport network zero carbon by 2050 – this will bring improvements in air quality (see the Mayor’s Transport Strategy).

To achieve this we need to support and accelerate the shift to zero emission technologies.

Electric vehicle (EV) infrastructure

Speeding up the move to electric vehicles is critical to creating a zero emission future. The Mayor established the Electric Vehicle (EV) Infrastructure Taskforce in 2018. Experts from the public and private sector representing business, energy, infrastructure, government and London boroughs – supported by more than 350 stakeholders from over 140 different organisations – looked at ways to unlock barriers to expanding charging infrastructure and accelerating the switch to EVs in London.

The London electric vehicle infrastructure delivery plan shows fleets, businesses and London’s residents that there is a clear way forward towards the right type and amount of charging infrastructure to serve London’s needs.

Zero emission capable (ZEC) vehicles

ZEC is the collective term for vehicles that can operate with zero exhaust emissions. Most car and van manufacturers have ZEC models available, with more due to come to market in the next few years. Find out more about ZEC vehicles, and get help to choose the right vehicle for you, at Go Ultra Low.

There are three types of ZEC vehicles:

  • 100% pure electric vehicles are powered by a battery which drives the electric motor. They have no exhaust emissions. Battery electric vehicles typically have a range of around 80 miles but some can achieve up to 300 miles
  • Plug-in hybrid and range-extended electric vehicles also have a conventional diesel or petrol engine, meaning they have a longer range than with a battery alone
  • Hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles have a fuel cell which uses hydrogen to produce electricity and power the vehicle’s wheels. They typically have a range of around 300 miles

Benefits

By switching to a zero emission capable vehicle you can save money on fuel costs, reduce harmful vehicle emissions and help clean up London’s air.

There are also financial benefits:

 

How to charge your vehicle

Most people charge at home overnight or at their workplace, but some will need to charge while they are on the move. Grants are available for electric vehicle charging infrastructure at home and at workplaces.

Public charge points can be found on the street and in key destinations such as shopping areas. You will usually need your own charging cable to use public charge points, although rapid charge points have the cable built in.

Different manufacturers use different connector types. Check with your vehicle manufacturer to find out what type of connector your vehicle uses and whether it is capable of rapid charging.

Charge point maps by Zap-Map show where your nearest public charge point is, the connector types, charging speeds, which network the charge point is operated by and how much it will cost to charge. Frequent users can join network membership schemes. Most networks also offer pay as you go charging.

We have guidance and research about zero emission capable vehicles that will help us, the London boroughs and charge point providers put charging infrastructure in the right places. Find out about ULEV research.

Rapid charge points for London

Rapid charge points can charge an electric vehicle battery in 20-30 minutes. This is quicker than regular charge points that can take 7-8 hours for a full charge.

At most of these charge points you can pay as you go with a credit or debit card – you don’t need to be a member.

Rapid charging bays (e-bays) are designed to be used by electric vehicle users only while charging. Any other vehicle parked in the bay may be issued with a penalty.

We’ve created more than 180 rapid charge points across London – we’re committed to installing 300 by 2020.

Mayor’s map of electric vehicle charge points

The London Electric Vehicle Charge Points map is a simplified map of rapid charge points across Greater London and up to the M25. The map shows:

  • Your nearest public and taxi-only charge points
  • Charging speed
  • Which network the charge point is operated by
  • Operating hours
  • Charge points delivered with our support

The map does not currently show all non-TfL funded charging points across London.

Find your nearest charge point

We’re investing £18m and working with the boroughs and other organisations to provide the rapid charging points London needs. Sites are on arterial roads we own and maintain, borough roads, car parks and on private land, including Heathrow Airport and multiple Shell service stations.

Most networks also offer pay as you go charging (charge point costs will depend on the operator).

Other rapid charge points

Non-TfL funded rapid charge points are also available in London.

Taxi-only rapid charge points

The Mayor wants to establish London’s taxi fleet as the greenest in the world and to phase out diesel. New taxis need to be zero-emission capable to be licensed. Tighter requirements have also been introduced for private hire vehicles (minicabs). Find out more about our how we’re creating greener taxis and greener PHVs.

Rapid charge points will promote the greening of London’s iconic black cab fleet, with many charging points dedicated exclusively to their use. E-taxi bays in several places are being restricted to London licensed e-taxis only. Drivers of other electric vehicles who park in an e-taxi bay risk getting a penalty. Find alternative charging locations on the Zap Map website.

Rapid charging networks

Five networks will be responsible for installing, operating and maintaining rapid charge points on public land across London. These networks are ESB EV SolutionsFastnedGeniePointPOLAR and Source London.

Drivers will be able to pay to use rapid charge points without having to register or being a member of a scheme. Visit the network websites for more information on charging costs.

Customer support

Customers will be supported by network operators at 24-hour, seven-days-a-week call centres. They have access to the latest information, such as the location and availability of rapid charge points, both on the web and through apps. The location data is being made available to encourage developers to create more apps.

Go Ultra Low City Scheme

The Go Ultra Low City Scheme (GULCS) is a joint TfL and borough programme that aims to deliver over 1,000 on-street electric charge points for London’s residents and car club vehicles by the end of 2020. The residential charging network will help Londoners without access to off-street parking make the switch to zero emission capable vehicles. Car club charging points will help car club operators transition their fleets. Contact your local borough’s transport officer to register your interest in a charge point.

The GULCS project is also funding at least six ‘Neighbourhood of the Future’ (NoF) projects – these will act as a testbed for innovative EV charging technologies, initiatives and policies to support the growth of clean vehicles in London.

Commercial vehicles

Zero emission capable vehicles can help businesses and commercial drivers reduce costs, emissions and the level of servicing and maintenance required.

LoCITY is an industry-led programme with information to help the freight and fleet sector reduce emissions and switch to ZEC vehicles. 

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New rules for electric vehicle chargepoints

New rules for electric vehicle chargepoints

New rules for electric vehicle homecharge points

Government-funded electric vehicle homecharge points must include smart technology to help drivers limit costs from next month, the Department for Transport (DfT) has announced.

Smart charging can encourage cheaper, off-peak charging and minimise the impact of electric vehicles on the electricity system by reducing demand peaks, the DfT said.

From July 1, devices backed by the Electric Vehicle Homecharge Scheme must be capable of being remotely accessed.

We’re in the driving seat of the zero emission revolution

Roads Minister Michael Ellis

Roads Minister Michael Ellis said: “The Government wants the UK to be the best place in the world to build and own an electric vehicle, with leadership and innovation helping us pave the way to a zero emission future.

“We’re in the driving seat of the zero emission revolution. Our new requirements for homecharge points could help keep costs down, ensuring the benefits of green transport are felt by everyone.”

Steve Gooding, director of motoring research charity the RAC Foundation, said: “A big selling point of green motoring is the low cost of running an electric car.

“Anything that cuts owners’ costs still further must be positive, though it will be interesting to see whether these chargers actually deliver the savings drivers now expect.”

The Government announced a plan last summer to ban the sale of new petrol and diesel cars and vans by 2040.

Alternatively-fuelled vehicles such as pure electrics and plug-in hybrids made up 6.6% of the new car market in May, compared with 5.6% during the same month in 2018.

Since 2013, the Government has supported the installation of more than 110,000 domestic homecharge points through grants.

 

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Electric A9 future and beyond

Electric A9 future and beyond

Electric future for A9 and beyond

Further support has been announced by the Scottish Government in support of the ambitious commitment to phase out the need for new petrol and diesel cars and vans by 2032.

The overall budget for the popular Low Carbon Transport Loan, has increased from £8m to £20m for 2018/19, allowing more businesses and consumers to make the switch to electric vehicles (EVs) than ever before.

To further accelerate the transition of EVs into public sector fleets, the Switched on Fleets budget has been quadrupled from £1.2 million to £4.8 million in 2018/19. Additionally, a new funding stream, the Switched on Towns and Cities Challenge Fund has been announced. Through intensive action, it is designed to enable a step-change in the uptake of EVs in Scotland’s towns and cities.

Launching Electric A9 Project

Minister for Transport Humza Yousaf attended Falkirk Stadium, the future site of an EV charging hub being funded through Transport Scotland’s European Regional Development Fund Low Carbon Travel and Transport Programme, to launch the Electric A9 project and announce the range of new funding streams on offer. He said:

“The Electric A9 will greatly expand and build further resilience into our existing ChargePlace Scotland infrastructure, which is already one of the most comprehensive in Europe. From the site of the planned hub here in Falkirk and all the way to Scrabster, visitors and local communities will be able to benefit from multiple charge place hubs across the route.

“Our ambitions, however, stretch even further than the longest road in Scotland. We want every town and city to enjoy the benefits of EVs and this requires an even wider charging network. The new Switched on Towns and Cities Challenge Fund will support local authorities and partners to implement activities to incentivise the uptake of EVs in urban areas.

“We have more than doubled the amount of loan funding we currently offer to individuals and businesses, and have quadrupled the amount of support for public sector fleets so that we can demonstrate leadership and showcase the many benefits of EVs to all of Scotland. Through the Electric A9 and the wider programme announcements, we are committed to securing the opportunities that the global transformation in mobility is creating. With the various funding streams we have on offer and our ambitious plans for the Electric A9 and beyond, I’m proud that Scotland continues to lead the way in supporting and encouraging EVs on to our roads.”

Electric A9

The Scottish Government believes that Electric Vehicles (EVs) are key to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and improving air quality. EVs will have a key role in supporting our renewable energy ambitions and local energy systems. EVs will bring benefits to drivers, communities and the wider environment.

That’s why we’re proud to introduce the Electric A9. Scotland’s longest EV-ready route will stand as a beacon to those at home and abroad. It is a clear signal that EVs are a viable, sustainable option now, and that the provision of this infrastructure clearly supports the Scottish Government’s vision to phase out the need for new petrol and diesel cars and vans by 2032.

What is the Electric A9?

The Electric A9 will expand and reinforce Scotland’s existing EV charge place infrastructure. This exemplar project will run along the entire route of the A9. By developing multiple EV charge place hubs along the route, we will help drivers in rural and urban Scotland access the benefits of driving EVs. The Electric A9 will provide EV charging for long distance journeys, local charging for businesses and residents, and charging at your destination.

The Electric A9 EV charge place hubs will be located along the route of the A9 within local communities; between Falkirk Stadium in the south to Scrabster Harbour in the north. Each hub facility will provide multiple charge points and access to associated amenities. At 273 miles (439 km), the A9 is the longest road in Scotland. Historically it was the main road between Edinburgh and John o’ Groats, and has been called the “Spine of Scotland”.

Why are we developing the Electric A9?

The Scottish Government is committed to supporting the uptake of EVs. As detailed in the Programme for Government announcement of 5th September, in order to lead the way on electric vehicles, we plan to expand our electric charging infrastructure between now and 2022, whether in rural, urban or domestic settings. We will continue to build on the actions set out in the “Switched on Scotland Action Plan” launched in June 2017.

When will the Electric A9 be open?

Through ChargePlace Scotland, we already have one of the most comprehensive EV charge networks in Europe; with over 800 publicly available charge points, including over 175 rapid chargers. You will soon see visible signs for the Electric A9 along the A9, including improvements in road signage to guide you to existing charge places. New charge places along the route will be advertised as they go live, so please keep an eye on our twitter feeds @ChargePlaceScot and @transcotland for these exciting additions to ChargePlace Scotland.

Who is delivering the Electric A9?

We will work closely with road operators, energy networks and key stakeholders to develop the trunk road EV network. The Electric A9 will be Scotland’s exemplar EV infrastructure project. But our ambitions go further. Transport Scotland will continue to work with all 32 Scottish local authorities, the Energy Saving Trust and other key stakeholders to deliver a comprehensive network that benefits the whole country.

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Leading UK scientists set out resource challenge of meeting EV targets by 2050

Leading UK scientists set out resource challenge of meeting EV targets by 2050

UK scientists set out resource challenge of meeting EV targets by 2050

UK Natural History Museum Head of Earth Sciences Prof Richard Herrington and fellow expert members of SoS MinErals (an interdisciplinary program of NERC-EPSRC-Newton-FAPESP funded research) recently wrote a letter to the UK Committee on Climate Change pointing out that meeting UK electric car targets for 2050 would require production of just under two times the current total annual world cobalt production, nearly the entire world production of neodymium, three quarters the world’s lithium production and at least half of the world’s copper production.

A 20% increase in UK-generated electricity would be required to charge the current 252.5 billion miles to be driven by UK cars.

Last month, the Committee on Climate Change published a report—Net Zero: The UK’s Contribution to Stopping Global Warming—which concluded that “net zero is necessary, feasible and cost effective.” Using its scientific expertise and collection of geological specimens, the Museum is collaborating with leading researchers to identify resource and environmental implications of the transition to green energy technologies including electric cars.

The urgent need to cut CO2 emissions to secure the future of our planet is clear, but there are huge implications for our natural resources not only to produce green technologies like electric cars but keep them charged.

Over the next few decades, global supply of raw materials must drastically change to accommodate not just the UK’s transformation to a low carbon economy, but the whole world’s. Our role as scientists is to provide the evidence for how best to move towards a zero-carbon economy—society needs to understand that there is a raw material cost of going green and that both new research and investment is urgently needed for us to evaluate new ways to source these. This may include potentially considering sources much closer to where the metals are to be used. Prof Richard Herrington

The challenges set out in the letter are:

  • The metal resource needed to make all cars and vans electric by 2050 and all sales to be purely battery-electric by 2035. To replace all UK-based vehicles today with electric vehicles (not including the LGV and HGV fleets), assuming they use the most resource-frugal next-generation NMC 811 batteries, would take 207,900 tonnes cobalt, 264,600 tonnes of lithium carbonate (LCE), at least 7,200 tonnes of neodymium and dysprosium, in addition to 2,362,500 tonnes copper.

This represents just under two times the total annual world cobalt production, nearly the entire world production of neodymium, three quarters the world’s lithium production and at least half of the world’s copper production during 2018. Even ensuring the annual supply of electric vehicles only, from 2035 as pledged, will require the UK to annually import the equivalent of the entire annual cobalt needs of European industry.

  • The worldwide impact: If this analysis is extrapolated to the currently projected estimate of two billion cars worldwide, based on 2018 figures, annual production would have to increase for neodymium and dysprosium by 70%, copper output would need to more than double and cobalt output would need to increase at least three and a half times for the entire period from now until 2050 to satisfy the demand.
  • Energy cost of metal production: This choice of vehicle comes with an energy cost too. Energy costs for cobalt production are estimated at 7000-8000 kWh for every tonne of metal produced and for copper 9000 kWh/t. The rare-earth energy costs are at least 3350 kWh/t, so for the target of all 31.5 million cars that requires 22.5 TWh of power to produce the new metals for the UK fleet, amounting to 6% of the UK’s current annual electrical usage. Extrapolated to 2 billion cars worldwide, the energy demand for extracting and processing the metals is almost 4 times the total annual UK electrical output
  • Energy cost of charging electric cars: There are implications for the electrical power generation in the UK needed to recharge these vehicles. Using figures published for current EVs (Nissan Leaf, Renault Zoe), driving 252.5 billion miles uses at least 63 TWh of power. This will demand a 20% increase in UK generated electricity.
  • Challenges of using “green energy” to power electric cars: If wind farms are chosen to generate the power for the projected two billion cars at UK average usage, this requires the equivalent of a further years’ worth of total global copper supply and 10 years’ worth of global neodymium and dysprosium production to build the windfarms.
  • Solar power is also problematic: it is also resource hungry; all the photovoltaic systems currently on the market are reliant on one or more raw materials classed as “critical” or “near critical” by the EU and/ or US Department of Energy (high purity silicon, indium, tellurium, gallium) because of their natural scarcity or their recovery as minor-by-products of other commodities. With a capacity factor of only ~10%, the UK would require ~72GW of photovoltaic input to fuel the EV fleet; over five times the current installed capacity. If CdTe-type photovoltaic power is used, that would consume over thirty years of current annual tellurium supply.

Both these wind turbine and solar generation options for the added electrical power generation capacity have substantial demands for steel, aluminium, cement and glass.

The co-signatories, like Prof Herrington, are part of SoS MinErals, an interdisciplinary program of NERC-EPSRC-Newton-FAPESP funded research focusing on the science needed to sustain the security of supply of strategic minerals in a changing environment. This program falls under NERC’s sustainable use of natural resources (SUNR) strategic theme. Co-signatories are:

  • Professor Adrian Boyce, Professor of Applied Geology at The Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre
  • Paul Lusty, Team Leader for Ore Deposits and Commodities at British Geological Survey
  • Dr Bramley Murton, Associate Head of Marine Geosciences at the National Oceanography Centre
  • Dr Jonathan Naden, Science Coordination Team Lead of NERC SoS MinErals Programme, British Geological Society
  • Professor Stephen Roberts, Professor of Geology, School of Ocean and Earth Science, University of Southampton
  • Associate Professor Dan Smith, Applied and Environmental Geology, University of Leicester
  • Professor Frances Wall, Professor of Applied Mineralogy at Camborne School of Mines, University of Exeter

 

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