Powersystems bolsters Bristol Port green credentials with electric vehicle charging infrastructure

Powersystems bolsters Bristol Port green credentials with electric vehicle charging infrastructure

Powersystems are part of a nationwide team that design, install, commission and maintain electrical vehicle (EV) infrastructure to support fleet transport operators for Land, Rail and Sea at Ports and Airports.

As the preferred electrical infrastructure partner for over 25 years, Powersystems one of the UK’s leading high voltage engineering specialists have been appointed to design, supply, install, test and commission the electric vehicle charging infrastructure for The Bristol Port Company.

Bristol Port is preparing its first Air Quality Strategy which will set out long-term plans to reduce emissions of pollutants and greenhouse gases within the Port Estate, helping to safeguard public health and protecting the environment.  The development of the Strategy gives Bristol Port the opportunity to build on existing environmental initiatives; to continue to make further reductions in emissions from port operations; and work in partnership with others to contribute to clean air initiatives in the wider Bristol and North Somerset area.

As part of the package of measures to contribute towards Bristol Port’s Air Quality Strategy, Bristol Port has reinforced its green credentials by investing in new electric vehicles and associated charging points.

This first stage of converting the Port fleet to electric vehicles will see four diesel fuelled Ford Connect vans replaced, with new zero emission e-NV200 Nissan vans.  This investment includes the installation of electric charging points at both Avonmouth and Portbury Docks, and new state-of-the-art air quality monitors.

Bristol Port requires additional infrastructure within their LV network to facilitate Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE), which will enable charging of their new Nissan e-NV200 electric vehicles. Powersystems were tasked with the design, installation and commissioning of the required LV infrastructure and EVSE units.

Powersystems provided the solution for supplying and installing two 14.4 kVA rated dual outlets; each outlet rated at 7 kW, the required LV infrastructure to facilitate the EVSE units, civils works and the installation of a back office management system with wireless unit communications which enables Bristol Port to collate data such as how much energy is being consumed and by who.

The Port derives approximately 35% of its electricity from the three 2-megawatt wind turbines on Avonmouth Dock, and continues to take significant steps to be more energy efficient.

Anne Hayes, Environment Manager at the Port said: “The future is green for Bristol Port. The newly acquired electric vans will promote sustainable travel around the docks. The new quiet vans are fully electric and produce zero harmful emissions.

The Port is in the process of installing dedicated twin charging points at both Avonmouth and Royal Portbury Docks. We are grateful to North Somerset Council for providing contributory funding towards these charging points under the “Go Ultra Low” scheme.  This has helped us to make an essential first step in our transition to a zero emission fleet.” Anne continued to say “Joining the new vans will be two e-bikes that the Port has secured with the help of funding from Travelwest and Bristol City Council.  These pool e-bikes will provide a sustainable means for staff to travel around Avonmouth and Portbury Docks, not only helping to reduce our emissions and carbon footprint, but importantly promoting health and well-being for our employees”.

The works aren’t complete yet, Powersystems anticipate this to be complete by the end of March

Click here to learn more about the environment work at Bristol Port.

Powersystems have been engaging with and assisting the major fleet operators in the UK with their grid and infrastructure requirements as the nation moves towards decarbonised transportation.

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Bristol Airport switches to 100 per cent renewable electricity

Bristol Airport switches to 100 per cent renewable electricity

Bristol Airport switches to 100 per cent renewable electricity

In a significant step towards reducing its carbon footprint, Bristol Airport has switched to a 100 per cent renewable electricity supply. The announcement follows the recent publication of a carbon roadmap setting out how the Airport will become carbon neutral by 2025 for emissions within its direct control.

The new three-year agreement with global renewable energy supplier, Ørsted, will see the Airport’s annual electricity use of 17 million kWh powered entirely by renewable sources. Electricity is the largest contributor to carbon emissions from on-site airport operations. In addition to the electricity used in the terminal and other buildings, a growing number of aircraft stands are equipped with Fixed Electrical Ground Power (FEGP), reducing the need to use diesel powered engines for essential pre-flight services. Over the duration of the contract an estimated 14,000 tonnes of carbon will be saved across the Airport site as a result of the move to renewables – equivalent to the emissions from driving 34 million miles in an average car.

Simon Earles, Planning and Sustainability Director at Bristol Airport, said: “From next month our terminal and other facilities will be powered by renewable energy – a significant step on our journey to carbon neutrality. There is more to do, but this is a clear statement of our intent to reduce our direct emissions.”

Ashley Phillips, Managing Director at Ørsted Sales (UK) Ltd said: “It’s exciting that an international airport like Bristol is placing such strong emphasis on sustainability. At Ørsted, we want to drive the transition to low-carbon energy systems in the UK, and support organisations like Bristol Airport that share this ambition of creating a greener energy future.”

As well as addressing direct emissions, Bristol Airport’s carbon roadmap includes a commitment to offset road journeys by passengers and explains how flights will tackled through the Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation (CORSIA) – an international agreement aimed at stabilising emissions at 2020 levels.

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What is a District Network Operator

What is a District Network Operator

DNO: Distribution Network Operators in the UK

A short guide to electricity distribution companies and what they do

This guide is intended to provide general guidance only. It is not intended to give you advice on your personal financial circumstances. You should seek independent professional advice if you’re unsure about anything mentioned in this guide or what choices to make.

A Distribution Network Operator is a company licensed to distribute electricity in the UK. These companies own and operate the system of cables and towers that bring electricity from the national transmission network to our homes and businesses.

Unlike the widely known Big Six energy companies that sell electricity to consumers, many of the leading distribution companies are largely unknown to the public. In this guide we’ll look at what they do and who they are.

What is a Distribution Network Operator (DNO)?

Although most people in the UK are familiar with the energy company they buy their electricity from, they actually rely on four types of companies to keep the lights on. These companies make up the UK power network:

  • Generation: power plant ownership and operation
  • Transmission: operate high voltage transmission networks
  • Distribution: operate local distribution via towers, cables and meters
  • Suppliers: electricity sellers like the Big Six and OVO energy

The company that is responsible for the distribution of electricity from the national transmission grid to your home or business is the Distribution Network Operator, or DNO. These are the people you should call if there is a power cut as they are responsible for the network of towers, transformers, poles, cables and meters that deliver power to your home. If you are experiencing a power cut call 105, this is free from most landline and mobile numbers and will put you straight through to your District Network Operator.

DNO regions and operators

In Great Britain there are 14 different district networks or DNO regions. However, because these 14 regions are managed by just six operators, it is relatively simple to work out who yours is.

The map below from the Energy Networks Association provides a good visual idea of where they operate. If you are looking to work out who your DNO is then check the map; contact details follow in the table below.

Who is my District Network Operator?

The map above should give you a good idea as to who you Distribution Network Operator is. If you’d like to contact them check out the details below from the ENA:

UK District Network Operators
Area (code) Company Emergency No. Website Twitter account
North Scotland (17) SSE Power Distribution 0800 300 999 www.ssepd.co.uk @southernelecPD
Central and Southern Scotland (18) SP Energy Networks 0800 092 9290 www.spenergynetworks.co.uk @SPEnergyNetwork
North East England (15) Northern Powergrid 0800 668 877 www.northernpowergrid.com @Northpowergrid
North West England (16) Electricity North West 0800 195 4141 www.enwl.co.uk @ElectricityNW
Yorkshire (23) Northern Powergrid 0800 375 675 www.northernpowergrid.com @Northpowergrid
Merseyside, Cheshire, North Wales and North Shropshire (13) SP Energy Networks 0800 001 5400 www.spenergynetworks.co.uk @SPEnergyNetwork
East Midlands, West Midlands, South Wales & South West England (11, 14, 21, 22) Western Power Distribution 0800 6783 105 www.westernpower.co.uk @wpduk
Eastern England (10) UK Power Networks 0800 783 8838 www.ukpowernetworks.co.uk @UKPowerNetworks
Southern England (20) SSE Power Distribution 0800 072 7282 www.ssepd.co.uk @southernelecPD
London (12) UK Power Networks 0800 028 0247 www.ukpowernetworks.co.uk @UKPowerNetworks
South East England (19) UK Power Networks 0800 783 8866 www.ukpowernetworks.co.uk @UKPowerNetworks
Northern Ireland Northern Ireland Electricity 0345 764 3643 www.nie.co.uk @NIElectricity

 

District Network Operator solar connection

Whenever you connect a form of electricity generation to the grid, you need to inform your local Distribution Network Operator (DNO). In general this is not a big issue, but you should be aware that your responsibilities are different depending on the size of the system you are looking at. Any installer registered with the Microgeneration Certification Scheme should be well aware of these details, but it’s worth being clear yourself:

Smaller systems: If you are connecting a small system (up to 16A per phase or 3.7 kW), then your installer just needs to inform the DNO with 28 days of the system’s commissioning. Such small systems are unlikely to result in load issues for the local grid, so the regulation is relatively simple. For more details consult this guide on the G83/2engineering recommendation.

Larger systems: For bigger systems your installer will need to get permission from the DNO in order to connect to the grid. In many cases this will require a network study (which you may be charged for) to ensure that the local grid network is adequate for the power your system will produce. If the grid needs additional work to cope with the energy from your system, the DNO is required to provide you with a quote for the work within 45 days.

 

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Siemens inaugurates world’s largest electrothermal energy storage system

Siemens inaugurates world’s largest electrothermal energy storage system

Siemens inaugurates world’s largest electrothermal energy storage system

A ‘milestone’ electric thermal energy storage system operated by Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy is now operational.

The heat storage facility is located in Hamburg-Altenwerder in Germany and contains around 1000 tonnes of volcanic rock as an energy storage medium.

It is fed with electrical energy converted into hot air by means of a resistance heater and a blower that heats the rock to 750°C. When demand peaks, electric thermal energy storage (ETES) uses a steam turbine for the re-electrification of the stored energy. The ETES pilot plant can thus store up to 130 MWh of thermal energy for a week. In addition, the storage capacity of the system remains constant throughout the charging cycles.

The aim of the pilot plant is to deliver system evidence of the storage on the grid and to test the heat storage extensively. In a next step, Siemens Gamesa plans to use its storage technology in commercial projects and scale up the storage capacity and power. The goal is to store energy in the range of several gigawatt hours in the near future – 1 GWh is the equivalent to the daily electricity consumption of around 50,000 households.

“With the commissioning of our ETES pilot plant, we have reached an important milestone on the way to introducing high-performance energy storage systems,” said Markus Tacke, Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy chief executive.

“Our technology makes it possible to store electricity for many thousands of households at low cost. We are thus presenting an elementary building block for the further expansion of renewable energy and the success of the energy transition.”
The technology reduces costs for larger storage capacities to a fraction of the usual level for battery storage.
The Institute for Engineering Thermodynamics at Hamburg University of Technology and the local utility company Hamburg Energie are partners in the innovative Future Energy Solutions project, which is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Energy.

Hamburg Energie is responsible for marketing the stored energy on the electricity market. The energy provider is developing highly flexible digital control system platforms for virtual power plants, it said. Connected to such an IT platform, ETES could optimally store renewable energy at maximum yield, said Siemens.

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Anaerobic Digestion (AD) A Renewable Energy Technology

Anaerobic Digestion (AD) A Renewable Energy Technology

Anaerobic Digestion (AD) Reducing Green House Gas (GHG)

Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a process that has been used very successfully in a large number of countries.  Over many years and for a number of purposes. This includes; energy production, nutrient management, waste stabilisation, and pathogen reduction. In all of these uses, it also contributes towards reducing greenhouse gas emissions, both directly and by offset.

It is the only technology currently in the market place that meets the European criteria for second generation bio-fuel production. And can achieve this using a range of mixed wastes, not just purpose-grown biomass. It is also a technology that has been neglected by successive governments. Many of which have climbed on the bandwagons of hydrogen, ethanol and bio-diesel as the renewable bio-fuels of the future. Despite the fact that bio-gas plants using the same substrates give consistently higher net energy yields

Investment in Large Processing Plants

AD will certainly make money for those who invest in large centralised processing plants that accept high energy-value waste inputs. Also charge gate fees, and receive subsidy for the heat or power they produce.

This is not, however, a solution that will maximise the energy potential of the available waste biomass. As by far the largest tonnages of materials are animal slurries and manures produced on farms. Although the energy potential of these per tonne is low. Should they be digested on farms, the overall net energy yield is significant

An even greater benefit may be the fact that digestion can reduce greenhouse gas emissions associated with manure management and improve nutrient management on the farm.

What is Anaerobic Digestion?

Anaerobic digestion (AD) is the controlled natural breakdown of organic materials into methane, carbon dioxide gas and fertiliser.  This takes place naturally or in an anaerobic digester.

AD produces bio-gas, a methane-rich gas that can be used as a fuel and digestate, a source of nutrients that can be used as a fertiliser. Increasingly AD is being used to make the most of our waste by turning it into renewable energy.

How Does the Anaerobic Digestion Process Work?

The process takes place inside an anaerobic digester; a large, sealed tank which is void of oxygen. The air supply is restricted to stimulate ‘anaerobic’ decomposition (as opposed to composting, which takes place in the presence of air). After 20 to 60 days, depending on the configuration and internal temperature of the digester, a methane-rich ‘bio-gas’ is produced.

This gas is commonly used for electricity and heat generation, and may also be upgraded for other applications. The biomass is heated to around the temperature of blood, when it will react with the naturally occurring micro-organisms and bacteria. It goes through four stages

  • Hydrolysis
  • Acidogenesis
  • Acetogenesus
  • Methanogenesis

The end result is that the bio-gas is emitted and a residual co-product is an odour-free ‘digestate’, which is rich in plant-available N, P and K and may be directly spread on the land as a fertiliser. Alternatively, digestate may be further separated or “dewatered” into a solid fraction (typically 25-35% dry matter, enriched in P) which can be used as a soil improver, and a liquid biofertiliser containing much of the ammonium and potassium that can be pumped or transported for land-spreading.

Both the gas and the digestate material can be re-used, therefore making it a very effective way to recycle your waste materials.

Anaerobic Digestion a Renewable Energy Technology

Anaerobic Digestion (AD) is one of a number of renewable energy technologies that have become commercially available to agriculture and industrial sectors.  A key attribute of AD is that it offers multiple environmental and economic benefits, particularly for UK dairy and livestock farms.

Anaerobic Digestion Plants Delivering Low Carbon Energy

Alongside their potential to deliver low carbon energy, on-farm AD plants also appear to be the most promising mitigation measure for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from manures and slurries.

Anaerobic digestion isn’t just some new fad though – this technology has actually been around since the 1800s for the treatment of sewage sludge. But, as concerns about the environment grow, so has the demand for ways to generate renewable energy and, as a result, more and more businesses have been investing in AD over the past few years.

The development of AD in Britain has been relatively slow compared to other renewable energy options, with about 125 plants operational at the end of 2013 and 500 by the autumn of 2017. At Powersystems we estimate 650 plants as of April 2019.

Feed-In Tariff (FIT) to April 2019

Up until April this year, the primary incentive available to farmers was the Feed-In Tariff (FIT), based on the installation of an AD plant if UK farmers were to change the way they handle slurry. The FIT, administered by DECC, did not encourage farmers to reduce pollution, but rather paid for them to generate renewable electricity using a combined heat and power plant (CHP) which runs off bio-gas from the AD process.

Powersystems Supporting Anaerobic Digestion and Combined Heat and Power Projects to Create Electricity

However, combining Anaerobic Digestion with Combined Heat and Power (CHP) to create electricity currently has a number of appreciable difficulties if compared with direct gas use (e.g. in a boiler). These include grid connection issues, significant extra capital/maintenance costs and plant complexity in terms of engineering a system which can continuously produce sufficient quantities of quality gas.

Powersystems can illustrate some of the benefits from on-farm AD  with a number of cases studies which highlight the experience of farmers that we have worked with and how we have helped them to overcome infrastructure challenges.

Read this case study about the Farleigh Wallop AD Plant

Challenges of Slurry Utilisation

The average farmer’s options to fully and economically utilise their slurries in an environmentally friendly manner are further compromised by the fact that:

  • the primary feed-stock (cattle slurry) is generally only available for 6 – 7 months when cows are housed indoors over the winter months
  • sufficient year-round on-farm organic substrates may be limited
  • there are significant regulatory financial penalties imposed for digesting the off-farm substrates (which have to be returned to land, anyway), including those which can be fed to cows

 Barriers to Anaerobic Digestion

Some farmers may not have the option or desire to grow energy crops in order to boost bio-gas output to improve the economics of using AD with CHP, for what is primarily their slurry treatment system, especially if the cost of bought in feed increases in line with fossil fuel costs, putting further pressure on farmers to grow their own crops to feed their cattle.

A further barrier is access to capital. Pollution control and other capital grants have largely been phased out. Banks are not prepared to lend money for a technology with which they are largely unfamiliar and suspicious of.

In addition, the UK AD market has been slow to develop (compared to elsewhere in the EU), so technology suppliers of smaller plant, where margins are smaller, tend not to have a large working capital base themselves, further increasing investment wariness.

Turning Waste Into Renewable Energy

Anaerobic digesters generate significant amounts of energy from agriculture materials and waste products from the food chain. The Coalition Government identified development of Anaerobic Digestion (AD) as an early win in 2010 with a commitment to work towards a ‘zero waste economy’.

Anaerobic Digestion can play an important role as a means of dealing with organic waste and avoiding, by more efficient capture and treatment, the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that are associated with its disposal to landfill.

AD also offers other benefits, such as recovering energy and producing valuable biofertilisers. The bio-gas can be used to generate heat and electricity, converted into bio-fuels or cleaned and injected into the gas grid.

Bio Gas

Anaerobic Digestion can be applied to a range of natural biodegradable materials, including food waste, slurry, sewage sludge and manure.

  • This material, known as biomass, is naturally broken down until it emits a new gas – known as bio-gas. Bio-gas is a methane-rich gas, comprising of around 60 per cent methane and 40 per cent carbon dioxide. This gas can then be used to generate energy.
  • Bio-gas can be used directly in engines for Combined Heat and Power (CHP), burned to produce heat, or can be cleaned and used in the same way as natural gas or as a vehicle fuel.
  • Bio gas can be used in stationery engines to generate electricity.
  • After removing the carbon dioxide (and other trace gases using a variety of methods in a process known as upgrading) the remaining methane is known as Renewable Natural Gas or Biomethane.

How the AD process works for Food Waste

Anaerobic digestion is an alternative way of composting food waste, while also producing renewable energy and avoiding carbon emissions. The process is called anaerobic because it takes place in the absence of oxygen in a sealed tank. Like composting, it is a natural process dependent on the micro-organisms that digest organic waste.

  • Collection – Food waste, collected from homes and businesses, is delivered – either directly or via a waste transfer station – to the reception hall of an anaerobic digestion facility.
  • Pre-treatment – First the food waste must be pre-treated to remove contaminants such as packaging and it is also diluted with water. Heating this waste mixture to 70°C for one hour kills all pathogens in the food.
  • Digestion – Now pasteurised, the waste is fed into the anaerobic digester. As with composting, bacteria break down the waste, converting it into biogas and a residue, which is called digestate.
  • Energy – Gas piped from the digester is used to generate electricity and heat.

The great thing about food waste is that it is produced by a community, it’s converted to electricity and it goes back to community again – it’s self-sustaining.

Biomethane

  • Is virtually identical to natural gas, the main difference is that is produced in days, rather than taking millions of years, billions of years ago.
  • The uses for Biomethane are therefore as varied as are those for natural gas, for heating, cooling as a source of chemicals, fertiliser or hydrogen.
  • When used as vehicle fuel, bio methane is without doubt, the world’s cleanest and most environmentally friendly fuel.

Carbon Dioxide

  • Is valued for its properties as an inert gas, for heat transfer and as a solvent.

Feedstock Suitable For use in the AD process can include

  • animal manures and slurries
  • energy crops such as maize or rye-grass silage and fodder beet
  • food processing by-products and pack-house residues
  • food waste from retailers
  • biodegradable household waste

What Are The Benefits?

AD provides many businesses with a way to turn the waste products they inevitable produce into new, clean energy, which can then be used on their own site. It can be utilised by any industry which produces food or sewage waste, including agricultural, sewage and food processing, and there are different sized systems available dependent on the amount of waste produced.

The methane-rich biogas which is generated can be used as a source of renewable energy to power electricity generators and provide heat. It can even be altered further and upgraded to filter out the majority of the carbon dioxide – the end result is bio-methane, which can then be used as vehicle fuel or to provide gas. Plus, the digestate can be used as fertiliser, suitable for organic farming systems.

By utilising anaerobic digestion, you can help reduce the amount of waste which you are sending to landfill. This in turn helps to reduce harmful emissions of harmful greenhouse gases, as biodegradable material which is simply sent to landfill will emit a large amount of methane, and carbon dioxide if it is simply left to rot.

How Widely Used Is This Technique?

The spotlight has fallen on waste over recent years. Currently, England generates around 177 million tonnes of waste a year – a disproportionate amount to what is reused or recycled. The government are trying to put measures in place to move towards a zero waste economy, which means that waste resources are fully valued and everything that can be reused and recycled is.

As part of this, the UK government and the European Union Directive have begun to introduce legal and financial incentives for diverting waste away from landfill, so taking advantage of this technology could even bring financial benefits for your business too.

Additionally, more people are looking to businesses to set an example when it comes to waste management and energy use. By utilising a technology which uses waste to create clean energy, you can help enhance your business’s reputation and values, reflecting your business as a responsible, conscientious company.

By investing in anaerobic digestion for your business, you will be taking a step towards making your business greener, and helping the country meet its waste disposal and energy targets

What does the UK produce that can be used in AD plant process?

The UK produces over 100 million tonnes of organic material that is suitable for treatment by AD. This includes:

  • 90-100 million tonnes of agricultural by-products like manure and slurry
  • 16-18 million tonnes of food waste (from households and industry)
  • 7 million tonnes of dry sewage sludge.

 How much energy can you get from waste?

The amount of energy produced by AD will vary depending on the material that goes into it and the particular type of digester that is used. Digesting 1 tonne of food waste can generate about 300 kWh of energy; slurry is lower yielding and purpose grown crops higher. According to the Renewable Energy Association, if all the UK’s domestic food waste was processed by AD, it would generate enough electricity for 350 000 households.

How much energy could anaerobic digestion generate in the UK?

AD could generate 10-20 TWh of heat and power per year by 2020. To put this in context, the UK’s largest power station Drax sold 27.1 TWh of electricity in 2012. AD could represent 3.8-7.5% of the renewable energy we estimate will be required in 2020.

 How many anaerobic digestion plants are there in the UK? 

AD has been used for many years in the UK by the water industry. It currently treats 66% of the UK’s sewage sludge in AD plants. Beyond the water industry AD in the UK is in its infancy, but growing rapidly. There are currently around 100 non-water industry anaerobic digesters in the UK producing bioenergy. You can see the locations of operational AD plants on the Biogas Map. There are many more digesters that are currently in the ‘planning’ stage of development.

Is digestate the same as compost? 

No. Digestate is not compost, although they have some similar properties.  Compost is produced by aerobic (with air) decomposition of biological material and digestate is produced by anaerobic (without air) decomposition of biological material. They can both be used as fertiliser under specific regulations.

 Does AD smell? 

There is some odour associated with the organic material that goes into a digester. However, AD can actually reduce nuisance odours as waste is delivered in closed vessels and vehicles, received in a closed reception area, and the digestion process takes place in a sealed tank. The digestion of slurry, for example, is significantly less odorous than the common practice of storing slurry in pits.

Is AD right for me? 

This website is a good place to start.  There is an AD cost calculator to look at the economics and there are lots of links to useful information and organisations. The key questions for a potential developer are:

  • Do you have access to sufficient feedstock?
  • Is there a market for the digestate?
  • What do you have in terms of good access, storing and handling facilities?
  • Are you willing to take on high capital project with capital rich initial period (i.e. can delayed returns be absorbed in your cash flow model)

 What are the benefits of AD? 

  • It turns waste into a resource. Instead of sending waste to landfill, we can use it to produce energy and fertiliser.
  • It produces fuel. Bio-gas can be used instead of fossil fuels.
  • Fertiliser is produced. Fertilisers are made from fossil fuels. The digestate from this can replace some synthetic fertilisers.
  • It reduces our carbon footprint.The methane produced during AD is burned as fuel, and therefore releases CO2 into the atmosphere.  Because it comes from biomass, this does not contribute to climate change. However, if the same waste was left to degrade in a landfill site, the methane produced could escape into the atmosphere: methane has a global warming potential 23 times larger than that of CO2. Therefore, harvesting and using methane from biomass can help to prevent climate change.
  • It can benefit many different people.  AD potentially benefits the local community, the environment, industry, farmers and energy entrepreneurs and government.

 What are the drawbacks of AD?

  • AD plants are 24-hour operations and as such they need to be fed regularly. Pumps and other machinery also need to be maintained to ensure production is not interrupted.
  • There can be noisedust, and if there are leaks the potential of smells and environmental contamination. However, these issues are strictly controlled by environmental regulations, so should not occur. The liquid part of the digestate contains nitrates and other chemicals which should not be released to water but which can safely be spread to land or processed for wider use.
  • The use of bio-gas also releases CO2, which is a greenhouse gas. However, this is offset because the bio-gas produced in AD replaces fossil fuels when it is used for heat, power or transport. If the waste were land-filled it would naturally rot and release methane, a potent greenhouse gas.

 

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Leeds GSC First Phase Energisation

Leeds GSC First Phase Energisation

Leeds General Infirmary Generating Station Complex (GSC) First Phase Energisation

Leeds General Infirmary Generating Station Complex (GSC) HV Switchgear replacement project – the first phase has now been energised.

To meet the increasing electrical load requirements of Leeds Royal Infirmary Powersystems successfully secured a £1.2m contract with ENGIE to replace the HV switchgear against strong local competition.

The added complexity of replacing the existing HV switchboard and NER in 4 phases within the existing HV Switchroom, showcases Powersystems technical ability.   Our reputation for exceeding expectations on technical know-how, quality and safety being the major contributor to our success.

Whilst ENGIE Services Ltd responsible for the wider contract to replace and upgrade the generation and HV/LV infrastructure feeding Leeds General Infirmary buildings, Powersystems scope was to deliver the following:

  • Design, supply, install and commission a new 17 Panel 11kV Switchboard, including all protection relays and system interfacing.
  • Remove an existing 18 panel 11kV, Double Busbar Switchboard.
  • Carry out temporary diversions/connections on new and existing HV cabling to ensure the continued operation of the generating Station complex.
  • Carry out scheduled cable changeovers from existing to new HV equipment.
  • Supply and install a new Neutral Earthing Resistor Panel (NER) within the HV Switchroom, including all HV, earthing and control cabling.
  • Supply and install all control cabling between the new HV switchboard and Local HMI/DCS Panels.
  • Configure and commission relays for all Incomers, Generator Feeders and Transformer Feeders.
  • Use in house expertise to configure and commission relays to use the new communications protocol IEC 61850 allowing for remote circuit breaker operation and relay monitoring through HMI and DCS.
  • Supply and install 2 new 1500kVA, 11,000/415V KNAN Transformers as well as associated LV AWA Single Core cabling to the Main LV Panels.
  • Design, supply, install and commission a new 110V DC Battery Charger supplying the HV Switchboard, NER Panel, NER control panel and LV panels within the GSC.
  • Install cable containment throughout the GSC for new and existing HV/LV cable.
  • Provide all Operation and Maintenance manuals as well as onsite training for the operations staff.

Powersystems have worked very successfully throughout the deliver phases with our client and their sub-contractors, reinforcing our reputation for technical competency, flexibility and commercial integrity. 

This has subsequently led to our client inviting us to tender a number of further complex HV equipment replacement projects across the UK.

The image attached shows Powersystems Project Engineer Darren Sampson carrying out final commissioning checks on the new section of 11kV switchgear Powersystems have installed as the first phase of our client ENGIE’s project to replace the existing 18 panel 11kV double busbar switchboard at Leeds General Infirmary Generation Complex.

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