Powersystems awarded high voltage electrical works contract for 16 MW Howpark Wind Farm

Powersystems awarded high voltage electrical works contract for 16 MW Howpark Wind Farm

Powersystyems are delighted to have been awarded the high voltage electrical works contract for 16 MW Howpark Wind Farm, a subsidy free project. The wind farm will be located approx. 2.8km north-east of Grantshouse, Scottish Borders.

The project works at Howpark Wind Farm will see the High Voltage Electrical Engineers Powersystems; design, supply, install, commission and set to work all the electrical works between the point of connection to the Distribution Network Operator (DNO) network and the connections in the base of each wind turbine. As well as design, supply and install the communication system for the wind farm.

As well as being appointed to construct the electrical works on the windfarm site Powersystems have also been appointed to construct the 13km 33 kV contestable grid connection to DNO, Scottish Power Energy Networks plc (SPEN). The connection is intended to be via an underground line from the site substation back to Eyemouth substation.

The Scottish Borders Council granted planning consent for the Howpark Wind Farm with eight Vestas V80 wind turbines, 2 MW at a maximum hub height of 60m and maximum tip height of 100m, associated works, infrastructure, compounds, buildings and meteorological mast.

Howpark Wind Farm is the first of a portfolio of projects that Locogen are developing and building in Scotland supporting mutual client Eurowind Energy (EWE).

EWE is a Danish company, founded in 2006, and which over the years has evolved into being a leading developer and operator of wind and solar projects. EWE own approximately 600 MW of wind and solar projects out of a total management portfolio of approximately 1,300 MW. This portfolio produces approximately 1,400 GWh per year, equivalent to 350,000 households’ annual electricity consumption.

EWE has a project footprint covering 12 European countries and has branches in Denmark (HQ), Germany, Poland, Romania, Portugal, Sweden and UK.

As part of building the UK carbon free future, Powersystems proudly support the design, installation, and commissioning of climate restoration technologies with connectivity in all renewable sectors.
Powersystems are powering the UK to a green recovery, with 5 GW of installed green energy as they play their part helping to decarbonise the National Grid.

Working with partners, delivering sustainable power solutions, proudly the Powersystems high voltage specialist team have connected 27% of all U.K. onshore wind farms.

Texas was a cascade failure of energy infrastructure, not renewables

Texas was a cascade failure of energy infrastructure, not renewables

What we have witnessed in Texas was a cascade failure of energy infrastructure.

The storms tripped an increased demand while power plants were undergoing routine maintenance, which was made worse by insufficient regulatory oversight meaning Texan authorities didn’t require energy assets to be resilient enough for winter.

Suddenly, there were issues with water, food, heat and health for millions of people. It isn’t just Texas. Places around the world, including the UK and California, have seen unusual grid instability.

Blame has been foisted onto Texas’ renewables, but the primary driver of the crisis was the loss of nearly 30 gigawatt-hours of gas, coal and nuclear generation in the state. The global push towards renewable energy has highlighted problems with ageing grid networks, but it also offers a solution.

Reducing greenhouse gas emissions requires widespread use of renewable sources, mainly wind and solar. But these cannot be controlled like so-called dispatchable sources such as natural gas and nuclear power.

After all, we aren’t in charge of when the sun shines or the wind blows. The result is that renewable energy produces more energy than is needed sometimes and not enough at others. For example, during 2020 over 1,500 gigawatt-hours – enough to power 250,000 homes for a year – of renewable electricity production went unused in California. In the UK, there was more wind energy available than could be used on 75 per cent of days last year.

As we saw in Texas, grid instability, combined with extreme weather events, can have a shocking knock-on effect.

This story has been playing out in Oxford, where a consortium of partners, including Invinity, are supporting the development of the Energy Superhub Oxford. It’s an ambitious project aiming to decarbonise transport and residential heating, which means a large-scale transition from fuel to electricity.

Storage comes in to play to address the inevitable stress on the electric network when everyone charges their car at the same time or turns up the heating on a cold morning, or, as in the case of Texas, when temperatures unexpectedly plummet. It effectively creates a fail-safe for the grid, to ensure there is always a constant supply of energy.

The Energy Superhub Oxford Project is home to the largest hybrid energy storage system of its kind. It combines lithium-ion batteries, which we are all familiar with, and “flow” batteries. Both are connected to the national grid.

Lithium-ion batteries work well with the grid when they are not used heavily, day in and day out. Think of old cell phones, you run the battery down all day and then charge it up all night, this sort of heavy use eventually degrades the capacity to a point where it is unusable.

A decarbonised global energy system will rely on a plethora of energy storage. The Texas crisis made that abundantly clear. Lithium-ion, hydrogen and flow will all have a part to play, applied where each is best suited.

It was recently estimated that the UK will require up to 30 gigawatt hours (30,000 MWh) of energy storage to meet net-zero targets. This is the equivalent of over 500 Energy Superhub Oxford projects and can only be addressed with the entire spectrum of storage technologies working in concert or independently as the use demands.

Addressing the climate crisis is an unprecedented opportunity for energy storage. But even more important is the opportunity to build a net-zero energy structure that is robust and resilient. That is a goal we can all work toward.

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GE unveils 6 MW turbine onshore giant

GE unveils 6 MW turbine onshore giant

GE Renewable Energy has launched a 6 MW turbine, the US manufacturer’s most powerful onshore machine.

The unit, which features a 164-metre rotor, is part of the Cypress platform and will increase annual energy production by up to 11% compared with the 5.3-158 model.

The new machine will feature a two-piece blade, and GE says it is designed with servicing in mind by facilitating up-tower repairs and featuring condition-based predictive services that will improve return-to-service and uptime, while lowering lifecycle costs.

The 6 MW turbine will be ready for deployment by 2022, the company said.

GE Onshore Wind Europe boss Peter Wells said: “The Cypress platform is already providing our customers the ability to lower the cost of onshore wind and gain added flexibility in siting turbines.

“This latest product in the platform will help them drive additional growth of clean, renewable wind power across Europe and beyond.”

Since its introduction, GE Renewable Energy has received more than 3.4

GW of orders for its Cypress turbines in multiple European countries including Germany, Austria, Sweden, and Lithuania, as well as Brazil, Australia, and Turkey.

The latest unit in the Cypress platform will fully leverage resources across GE and was developed in partnership between GE’s Onshore Wind business, GE’s Global Research Center and LM Wind Power, a GE Renewable Energy business.

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Government £12bn green recovery 10 point plan

Government £12bn green recovery 10 point plan

Ten-point £12bn Green Recovery economic spending plan announced by Boris Johnson.

Slowly but surely humanity is taking the upper hand in the fight against the virus. We have not won yet. There are still hard weeks and months to come. But with better drugs, testing and a range of vaccines, we know in our hearts that next year we will succeed. We will use science to rout the virus, and we must use the same extraordinary powers of invention to repair the economic damage from Covid-19, and to build back better.

Now is the time to plan for a green recovery with high-skilled jobs that give people the satisfaction of knowing they are helping to make the country cleaner, greener and more beautiful. Imagine Britain when a Green Industrial Revolution has helped to level up the country.

You cook breakfast using hydrogen power before getting in your electric car, having charged it overnight from batteries made in the Midlands. Around you the air is cleaner; trucks, trains, ships and planes run on hydrogen or synthetic fuel. British towns and regions — Teesside, Port Talbot, Port of Tyne, Merseyside and Mansfield — are now synonymous with green technology and jobs. This is where Britain’s ability to make hydrogen and capture carbon pioneered the decarbonisation of transport, industry and power.

My 10-point plan to get there will mobilise £12bn of government investment, and potentially three times as much from the private sector, to create and support up to 250,000 green jobs.

There will be electric vehicle technicians in the Midlands, construction and installation workers in the North East and Wales, specialists in advanced fuels in the North West, agroforestry practitioners in Scotland, and grid system installers everywhere. And we will help people train for these new green jobs through our Lifetime Skills Guarantee. Climate Capital Where climate change meets business, markets and politics.

This 10-point plan will turn the UK into the world’s number one centre for green technology and finance, creating the foundations for decades of economic growth.

One — we will make the UK the Saudi Arabia of wind with enough offshore capacity to power every home by 2030.

Two — we will turn water into energy with up to £500m of investment in hydrogen.

Three — we will take forward our plans for new nuclear power, from large scale to small and advanced modular reactors.

Four — we’ll invest more than £2.8bn in electric vehicles, lacing the land with charging points and creating long-lasting batteries in UK gigafactories. This will allow us to end the sale of new petrol and diesel cars and vans in 2030. However, we will allow the sale of hybrid cars and vans that can drive a significant distance with no carbon coming out of the tailpipe until 2035.

Five — we will have cleaner public transport, including thousands of green buses and hundreds of miles of new cycle lanes.

Six — we will strive to repeat the feat of Jack Alcock and Teddie Brown, who achieved the first nonstop transatlantic flight a century ago, with a zero emission plane. And we will do the same with ships.

Seven — we will invest £1bn next year to make homes, schools and hospitals greener, and energy bills lower.

Eight — we will establish a new world-leading industry in carbon capture and storage, backed by £1bn of government investment for clusters across the North, Wales and Scotland.

Nine — we will harness nature’s ability to absorb carbon by planting 30,000 hectares of trees a year by 2025 and rewilding 30,000 football pitches’ worth of countryside.

And ten — our £1bn energy innovation fund will help commercialise new low-carbon technologies, like the world’s first liquid air battery being developed in Trafford, and we will make the City of London the global centre for green finance through our sovereign bond, carbon offset markets and disclosure requirements.

This plan can be a global template for delivering net zero emissions in ways that create jobs and preserve our lifestyles.

On Wednesday I will meet UK businesses to discuss their contribution. We plan to provide clear timetables for the clean energy we will procure, details of the regulations we will change, and the carbon prices that we will put on emissions. I will establish a “task force net zero” committed to reaching net zero by 2050, and through next year’s COP26 summit we will urge countries and companies around the world to join us in delivering net zero globally. Green and growth can go hand-in-hand. So let us meet the most enduring threat to our planet with one of the most innovative and ambitious programmes of job-creation we have known.

Words by Prime Minister Boris Johnson

 

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The European Marine Energy Centre adds flow battery storage to tidal for green hydrogen boost

The European Marine Energy Centre adds flow battery storage to tidal for green hydrogen boost

The European Marine Energy Centre (EMEC) in Orkney, Scotland, is to deploy an Invinity Energy Systems flow battery at its tidal energy test site on the island of Eday to make green hydrogen.

The combination of tidal power and 1.8 megawatt-hour flow batteries will be used to power EMEC’s hydrogen production plant, demonstrating continuous hydrogen production from variable renewable generation.

Invinity’s modular flow battery system is funded by the Scottish government, through the Highlands and Islands Enterprise (HIE), and will be assembled at the company’s manufacturing facility in Bathgate, West Lothian.

The system will consist of eight Invinity VS3 battery modules linked together into a single system. The project is expected to go live next year.

Invinity’s vanadium flow batteries (VFBs) are a form of heavy duty, stationary energy storage which are deployed in high-utilisation, industrial applications and provide hours of continuous power, one or more times per day.

At EMEC’s site, the system will store electricity generated by tidal turbines during high power periods, and discharge it during low power periods.

This will ‘smooth’ tidal generation to create continuous, on-demand electricity to turn into hydrogen using EMEC’s 670kW hydrogen electrolyser.

This will optimise hydrogen production at the site to enable tonnes of green hydrogen generation each year, EMEC said.

Scottish Energy Minister Paul Wheelhouse said: “We are delighted to support this world-first innovative energy systems project in Orkney, with £1.8m of funding from the Scottish Government.

“The demonstration of hydrogen and systems integration with renewables will be a key part of our energy transition pathways and we look forward to watching the progress of this exciting and pioneering project, building on the strong track record of Orkney and EMEC, in particular, in demonstrating hydrogen and integrated energy systems.”

EMEC managing director Neil Kermode said: “EMEC’s core purpose is to demonstrate technologies in new and inspired ways to decarbonise our energy system.

“This is the first time that a flow battery will have been coupled with tidal energy and hydrogen production, and will support the development of the innovative energy storage solution being developed in the Interreg NWE ITEG project.

“Following a technical review looking at how to improve the efficiencies of the electrolyser we assessed that flow batteries would be the best fit for the energy system.

“As flow batteries store electrical charge in a liquid rather than a solid, they can provide industrial quantities of power for a sustained period, can deeply discharge without damaging itself, as well as stand fully charged for extended periods without losing charge.

“These are all necessary qualities to integrate battery technology with the renewable power generation and hydrogen production process.”

Invinity chief commercial officer Matt Harper said: “We are thrilled to be part of this Scottish success story, showcasing the best of clean energy technology, backed by Scottish Government, designed and assembled in West Lothian by highly qualified Scottish engineers and installed in the Orkney Islands.

“This project is truly groundbreaking. Because of their inherent variability, all renewable energy sources – including wind, solar and tidal – have difficulty providing the consistent power that industrial processes like electrolysis need to operate most effectively.

“Including energy storage in a comprehensive renewables-to-hydrogen system bridges that gap, providing a path to accelerated commercialisation of future green hydrogen projects.

“Vanadium flow batteries are the perfect partner for tidal power, continually absorbing then dispatching four or more hours of continuous power, multiple times per day, over decades of service – a duty cycle that would rapidly degrade lithium batteries.

“Invinity eagerly anticipates working with EMEC to validate both their vision, and our VFB’s unique fit, for this revolutionary application.”

HIE Orkney area manager Graeme Harrison said: “The establishment of EMEC in 2003 was a key factor in placing Orkney at the international forefront of renewable energy development, particularly in the marine sector.

Demonstration of the production/use of green hydrogen within the Orkney energy system is the latest in a series of highly innovative projects in these islands that have helped us maintain our global lead ever since.

“Investing in the growth of Scotland’s green economy has been a feature of HIE’s approach for many years and will play a vital role in our future plans to support recovery from the economic impacts of Covid-19.

“We are very proud to be able to facilitate this exciting initiative and grateful to the Scottish government for making it’s funding available.”

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Renewable energy made up 90% of Scotlands’ electricity usage in 2019

Renewable energy made up 90% of Scotlands’ electricity usage in 2019

RENEWABLE energy accounted for 90% of all electricity used in Scotland last year, new figures have revealed.

The Scottish Government said more electricity was generated from renewable sources in 2019 than ever before – 30 terrawatt hours (TWh), up from 26.5 TWh in 2018.

With one year to go until a target of 100% gross electricity consumption from renewables, 2019 estimates found 90% came from renewable sources as opposed to 76.2% during the previous year.

The amount of renewable energy produced is equivalent to the electricity needed to power all Scottish homes for more than three years, or the energy used to charge 6.7 billion phones for a year.

The majority of Scotland’s renewable electricity continues to be converted from wind on land, despite offshore wind increasing production from 1.3 TWh to 3.3 TWh in the last year. This is attributed in part to the Beatrice wind farm off the Caithness coast becoming operational in May.

The Government added that renewable projects, predominantly offshore wind farms in the Moray Firth, are being planned or are under construction – with an estimated additional capacity of 13 GWh.

Gina Hanrahan from WWF Scotland said: “It’s great to see more and more of Scotland’s electricity demand being met from clean, cheap renewables.

“Whether we meet the 100% target this year or very soon, increased renewable electricity capacity is the most fundamental building block of a zero-carbon society.

“That’s why it’s great to see onshore wind projects able to compete once again in the electricity market.”

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