Viridor, Polymers 2 contract in Avonmouth

Viridor, Polymers 2 contract in Avonmouth

Powersystems your high voltage (HV) specialist partners – Are delighted to have been awarded the Viridor, Polymers 2 contract in Avonmouth, near Bristol.

Resource management company Viridor is set to open the UK’s largest multi-polymer plastic recycling plant in Avonmouth, which will be powered by energy generated from its £252-million energy recovery facility currently under construction on the same site.

The new plastics recycling plant is expected to cost £65 million and will process 81,000 tonnes of PET, HDPE and PP plastic bottles, pots, tubs and trays in its first year of operation, rising to 89,000 tonnes in year three. This will produce 60,000 tonnes of recycled plastic in year one, rising to 63,000 tonnes in year three. Any plastics deemed un-recyclable will be sent for energy recovery at the Avonmouth ‘Resource Recovery Centre’ (RRC), which is due to be completed by mid-2020.

The RRC will process 320,000 tonnes of non-recyclable waste every year, coming from Viridor’s local authority contracts in the region, including the Somerset Waste Partnership, and will generate around 32 megawatts of electricity. The energy produced will be used to power the plastics plant on the same site.

The project has been described as a ‘world-class facility’ and an ‘early sign of Viridor’s continuing commitment to UK plastics conversion’, joining similar projects announced this year by Biffa, Coral and Recycling Technologies at a time when there are growing calls to boost domestic plastic reprocessing and reduce reliance on the export of plastic waste.

A report by the National Audit Office, published in July of last year, found that exports of plastic packaging waste had increased six times since 2002, with much of this ending up in the natural environment of the countries it was exported to.

Images of the environmental damage wrought by improperly disposed plastic have led MPs to call for an end to the export of plastic waste to developing countries, while plastic waste has been added to the list of wastes subject to controls under the Basel Convention, limiting its trade.

The UK Government indicated in its Resources and Waste Strategy that it is seeking to stimulate demand for recycled plastic in the UK through increasing domestic reprocessing, with a tax on the manufacture and import of plastic packaging containing less than 30 per cent recycled plastic one of its flagship policies for doing so.

There is a clear ambition from both UK consumers and politicians to improve recycling rates and reduce the amount of waste which is sent to export. Research shows that 80 per cent of people believe the UK should find a way to deal with its own recycling without having to ship it to other countries.

Unless action is taken now and investment in infrastructure is made, a plastic recycling capacity gap will undermine UK ambitions and the sustainability targets of retailers and the big consumer brands.

The co-location of the plastics recycling facility and the Avonmouth Resource Recovery Centre aims to create greater sustainability and environmental efficiency in Viridor’s operations while creating ‘a recycling powerhouse’ in the South West.

To speak with the high voltage Energy from waste team call us on 01454 318000 or email us on enquiries@powersystemsuk.com

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Vattenfall plans London heat network

Vattenfall plans London heat network

VATTENFALL will design a heat network to supply more than 10,000 homes in London, using heat captured from Cory Riverside Energy’s energy-from-waste plant.

Vattenfall says the network in southeast London could reduce carbon emissions from heating homes by 80–90% compared to using conventional gas boilers. The heat network will take heat generated at the 750,000 t/y waste combustion plant and transport it to 10,500 local homes through a network of underground pipes.

The partners will apply to the Government’s £320m (US$400m) Heat Networks Investment Project to help fund the development. In April, Cory Riverside was granted permission to build a neighbouring energy-from-waste and anaerobic digestion facility that would divert up to 805,000 t/y of non-recyclable waste from landfill. It says this facility could then provide heat to another 10,500 homes.

Vattenfall said its design will introduce a new fourth generation, low temperature district heating network that will use lower temperatures to reduce network heat losses. It also said it wants to create an East London Heat Network extended 30 km across London that, including industry and commercial properties, would supply the equivalent of 75,000 homes though has not given a timescale.

“We can design the system so that future homes and business properties can also be linked up to the same heat network, without needing to go through the disruption and lengthy process of designing a bespoke network for a separate construction project. This is exactly the kind of long-term vision that Vattenfall has for district heating in the UK,” said Adriana Rodriguez Cobas, Vattenfall Director of London and South UK.

The Committee on Climate Change, which provides independent advice to government, estimates that around 18% of UK heat will need to come from heat networks by 2050 if the UK is to meet its carbon targets cost effectively. The statistics office within the UK’s Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has not yet responded to requests from The Chemical Engineer for information on the proportion of UK heat currently provided by heating networks.

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Planning Inspectorate approves Cory Riverside Energy second London energy from waste (EfW) plant

Planning Inspectorate approves Cory Riverside Energy second London energy from waste (EfW) plant

The Planning Inspectorate has approved Cory Riverside Energy’s plans for an energy from waste (EfW) plant Cory Riverside Energy’, with the capacity to process more than 800,000 tonnes per year based in Belvedere, south east London.

The plant will mean the construction of a second large EfW facility on the south bank of the river Thames for Cory. It will be developed alongside its existing facility which has a capacity of 750,000 tonnes of residual waste per year.

The proposal will be built next to Cory Riverside Energy’s existing plant Alongside the EfW plant, an anaerobic digestion facility with an annual waste throughput of up to 40,000 tonnes per annum of green and food waste is also to be constructed,  “enabling infrastructure for combined heat and power”.

This is thought to be significant as  Greater London Authority specifically mentioned the lack of offtake of heat from the plant in its response to the consultation on the proposed facility. “For the avoidance of doubt, an EfW facility that generates electricity only is not acceptable; it must also capture heat,” the GLA said.

Approved

In a letter today (09 April) approving the proposals, seen by letsrecycle.com, the Planning Inspectorate said: “The secretary of state as the decision maker under s103 and s104 of the Planning Act 2008 has decided that development consent should be granted and therefore has made an order”.

“Given the national need for the development, the secretary of state does not believe that this is outweighed by the development’s potential adverse impacts”

Planning Inspectorate

In a separate notice detailing its reasons, the Inspectorate added: “The secretary of state considers that there is a compelling case for granting development consent. Given the national need for the development… the secretary of state does not believe that this is outweighed by the development’s potential adverse impacts”.

Opposition

The plant was singled out for criticism by London mayor Sadiq Khan last year, who urged the government to reject the proposal as he said London doesn’t need another “archaic toxic polluting waste incinerator”.

This was criticised by the Environmental Services Association, which said the mayor was “ill-informed” Mayor Khan’s concerns had echoed a previous London Mayor’s views, those of Ken Livingstone, who was strongly opposed to the first plant, which was officially opened by the Princess Royal in 2o12

UK largest

It is thought that the plant, which had an initial 2024 operational aim, would be the second largest in the UK after the Viridor-owned Runcorn plant, which recently extended its capacity to more than one million tonnes.  However, combined, the two plants will have the capacity to process around 1.5 million tonnes of residual waste a year, larger than the Runcorn plant and even more than the huge AEB plant in Amsterdam. The decision comes two years after Cory Riverside Energy was sold to a consortium of investors

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