Powersystems will support Jones Bros for the installation of onshore cables for Dogger Bank Wind Farm

Powersystems will support Jones Bros for the installation of onshore cables for Dogger Bank Wind Farm

Delivery of onshore cables for Dogger Bank Wind Farm has started, according to Jones Bros Civil Engineering UK, the company responsible for installing the cables for the first two phases of the offshore wind project.

The first drum with the cables has already arrived and Jones Bros are set to commence installation this month.

In total, there will be around 130 kilometres of cabling installed for Dogger Bank A & B, with cable deliveries set to take place every fortnight. Over the course of the construction phase of the project, 82 cable drums will be transported to the site.

Each drum weighs 41 tonnes, with the combined weight (3,362 tonnes) heavier than Wimbledon’s Centre Court roof (3,000 tonnes), the civil engineering company said.

Bristol-based high voltage electrical engineering specialists Powersystems will support Jones Bros during the installation of the cables.

“The arrival of the cable drums marks a significant point in our works on the grid connection and land-based infrastructure”, said Jones Bros project manager James Lockwood“The 80 miles of cabling will be used along a 20 mile route to help connect the offshore wind farm to the national grid, and we remain committed to minimising disruption in the local area as we carry out this work”.

According to earlier information, NKT, which recently signed a contract for the delivery of Dogger Bank C offshore and onshore export cables, is also the supplier of the export cables for Dogger Bank A and B.

Dogger Bank Wind Farm, to be built more than 130 kilometres off the Yorkshire coast in the North Sea, is being developed in three 1.2 GW phases: Dogger Bank A, B and C.

Dogger Bank A and B is a joint venture between SSE Renewables (40 per cent), Equinor (40 per cent) and Eni (20 per cent), while Dogger Bank C is a 50:50 joint venture between SSE Renewables and Equinor.

The first two phases are scheduled to be operational by 2024, while the third phase, Dogger Bank C, is being developed on a different timescale with the operation date set for 2026.

Construction work on the first two phases is underway, with the third phase now also joining in after official ground-breaking in Teesside.

Contracts for Difference (CfD): Allocation Round 4

Contracts for Difference (CfD): Allocation Round 4

The next Contracts for Difference (CfD) auction will begin in December, the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) has confirmed.

By confirming that the round won’t take place until December, BEIS hopes to “provide further clarity to prospective participants” it said.

The announcement was made alongside the release of the government’s response to the changes to Supply Chain Plans and the CfD contract, which it launched in November 2020. This confirmed the decision to bring forward the assessment of a developer’s delivery of its supply chain commitments to shortly after a project’s Milestone Delivery Date.

Additionally, it confirmed that new powers in legislation will be given to the Secretary of State to assess a Supply Chain Implementation Statement, and either pass or refuse it. It also confirmed the introduction of a new Operational Condition Precedent, which has the potential for a CfD contract to be terminated if the Statement isn’t provided by a Low Carbon Contracts Company.

These latest supply chain proposals set out “challenging new demands for project developers” said RenewableUK’s deputy chief executive Melanie Onn, adding that it’s “vital” that guidance is clear on how the contribution towards job creation, skills development and fostering innovation in the supply chain is demonstrated.

“Project developers are already working with manufacturers to help them understand our projects’ needs and timelines, which will support investment in new facilities and the development of new skills in our workforce.

“Underpinning all this, we need large volumes of new capacity in the next CfD auction for new contracts to generate clean power to keep us on track for our 2030 target, quadrupling what we’ve already installed”.

It’s hoped the CfD round will double renewable energy capacity compared with the last round, expanding technologies including offshore wind, onshore wind, solar, tidal and floating offshore wind. The response from BEIS additionally confirmed that phasing will not be extended to floating offshore wind.

Round four will be particularly significant as established ‘Pot One’ technologies including solar PV and onshore wind will be able to bid in, with BEIS targeting support for 12 GW of new renewable capacity. In November, the government confirmed that the negative pricing rule for projects would be extended, however it is consulting further on potential amendments for energy storage and system flexibility.

ABB to deliver power converters for UK’s Dogger Bank wind farm

ABB to deliver power converters for UK’s Dogger Bank wind farm

In ABB’s largest order to date for medium voltage wind turbine converters, 95 units will be delivered to GE Renewable Energy and installed at the UK’s Dogger Bank Wind Farm.

The 95 PCS6000 medium voltage converters will be installed in GE’s Haliade-X 13MW wind turbines, which will produce 1.2GW of power in the first phase of the Dogger Bank project.

ABB’s converters will play the vital role of taking the power produced by GE’s wind turbines and converting it to the right voltage and frequency for the wind farm grid. The converters are rated to handle the high-power output, with one rotation of each 220-meter diameter rotor generating enough electricity to last a UK household two days.

“The selection of the right converter is critical to achieving the performance and reliability that yields the maximum return on investment. And medium-voltage converters are the optimum choice for today’s high-power wind turbines,” said Chris Poynter, division president for System Drives, ABB Motion.

ABB in Turgi, Switzerland is leading project engineering while the PCS6000 converters will be manufactured by ABB in Łódź, Poland. First delivery is scheduled for summer 2021 with completion in late 2022.

The Dogger Bank Wind Farm is being developed in three phases as a 50:50 joint venture between SSE Renewables and Equinor. It is located more than 130km from the North East coast of England and will have a total power output of 3.6GW, capable of powering six million homes.

ABB’s collaboration with GE began in 2017 and the companies have worked closely to optimize the PCS6000 converter for the Haliade-X platform. This included successful test operations on a turbine installed at the Port of Rotterdam, Netherlands.

Powersystems awarded the electrical works for Hendy Wind Farm

Powersystems awarded the electrical works for Hendy Wind Farm

Powersystems are delighted to have been awarded the electrical works contract for the 16.1 MW Hendy Onshore Wind Farm. The wind farm will be located on a site of 150 hectares near the village of Penybont, situated south west of Llandegley, Llandrindod Wells, Wales.

The 66 kV project works at Hendy Wind Farm will see the high voltage electrical engineers Powersystems; design, supply, install, commission and set to work all the electrical works between the point of connection to the Distribution Network Operator (DNO) network. The Point of Common Connection (POCC) for Hendy Wind  Farm 66/33kV substation will be situated within the WPD 66kV substation.

Powersystems will design, procure and install the 66kV and 33kV equipment for the electrical works project, this is expected to be a 40-week construction programme from start to finish.

The wind farm will comprise of 6no. Enercon E82 wind turbines plus 1no. Vestas V80 wind turbine; these with a Total Installed Capacity (TIC) of 16.1 MW. One turbine (the Vestas V80) is already installed and this will be connected into the overall wind farm system.

Powys Council granted planning consent for the Hendy Wind Farm for the turbines at 2.5 MW with a maximum hub height of 69m and maximum tip height of 110m, associated works, infrastructure, compound and buildings.

Hendy Wind Farm could generate enough energy to meet the demands for around 9,800* homes every year.

It is expected that Hendy Wind Farm will bring economic benefits to the area using materials sourced materials locally and using local companies during construction. Between £4.5m and £6.75m could be spent with local businesses during the construction period.

Wind energy isn’t just good for the environment, the construction of Hendy Wind Farm will deliver meaningful benefits for the local economy and community. A community fund will be set up based on £5,000 per MW per annum, which will deliver over £2m of investment in the local area throughout the lifetime of the wind farm.

As part of building the UK carbon free future, Powersystems proudly support the design, installation, and commissioning of climate restoration technologies with connectivity in all renewable sectors.
Powersystems are powering the UK to a green recovery, with 5 GW of installed green energy as they play their part helping to decarbonise the National Grid.

Working with partners, delivering sustainable power solutions, proudly the Powersystems high voltage specialist team have connected 27% of all U.K. onshore wind farms.

* This is based on Renewable UK and the following calculation Operational MW x 8760 (number of hours in a year) x 0.2782 (the capacity factor for both on & offshore wind) / 4192 (UK average domestic household consumption in kWh) and it should be noted that this is an estimate and not based on site specific data.

Powersystems awarded high voltage electrical works contract for 16 MW Howpark Wind Farm

Powersystems awarded high voltage electrical works contract for 16 MW Howpark Wind Farm

Powersystyems are delighted to have been awarded the high voltage electrical works contract for 16 MW Howpark Wind Farm, a subsidy free project. The wind farm will be located approx. 2.8km north-east of Grantshouse, Scottish Borders.

The project works at Howpark Wind Farm will see the High Voltage Electrical Engineers Powersystems; design, supply, install, commission and set to work all the electrical works between the point of connection to the Distribution Network Operator (DNO) network and the connections in the base of each wind turbine. As well as design, supply and install the communication system for the wind farm.

As well as being appointed to construct the electrical works on the windfarm site Powersystems have also been appointed to construct the 13km 33 kV contestable grid connection to DNO, Scottish Power Energy Networks plc (SPEN). The connection is intended to be via an underground line from the site substation back to Eyemouth substation.

The Scottish Borders Council granted planning consent for the Howpark Wind Farm with eight Vestas V80 wind turbines, 2 MW at a maximum hub height of 60m and maximum tip height of 100m, associated works, infrastructure, compounds, buildings and meteorological mast.

Howpark Wind Farm is the first of a portfolio of projects that Locogen are developing and building in Scotland supporting mutual client Eurowind Energy (EWE).

EWE is a Danish company, founded in 2006, and which over the years has evolved into being a leading developer and operator of wind and solar projects. EWE own approximately 600 MW of wind and solar projects out of a total management portfolio of approximately 1,300 MW. This portfolio produces approximately 1,400 GWh per year, equivalent to 350,000 households’ annual electricity consumption.

EWE has a project footprint covering 12 European countries and has branches in Denmark (HQ), Germany, Poland, Romania, Portugal, Sweden and UK.

As part of building the UK carbon free future, Powersystems proudly support the design, installation, and commissioning of climate restoration technologies with connectivity in all renewable sectors.
Powersystems are powering the UK to a green recovery, with 5 GW of installed green energy as they play their part helping to decarbonise the National Grid.

Working with partners, delivering sustainable power solutions, proudly the Powersystems high voltage specialist team have connected 27% of all U.K. onshore wind farms.

Powersystems Wind Energy NewsWatch Update April 2021

Powersystems Wind Energy NewsWatch Update April 2021

The Powersystems Renewables NewsWatch provides a roundup of the latest headlines relating to Wind Energy

With more investments in the efficiency, scale of wind and a strong project pipeline, the wind energy sector is a key enabler for the UK economy to achieve net zero by 2050.

Alongside contributions from other technologies, meeting this target will require a tenfold increase in offshore wind generating capacity to about 100 GW, which would be one of the biggest infrastructure projects the country has ever undertaken.

Wind energy relies on wind turbines to generate electricity. As the blades turn, they rotate a generator and a shaft that converts the energy into electricity. The UK is one of the best places in the world for wind-powered energy. The National Grid ESO explains electricity and wind power.

New records for green electricity

The news that Britain’s National Grid set a new record for green electricity on Easter Monday and again on the May bank holiday is a further sign that we are heading in the right direction – not just in the fight against climate change but also in terms of modernising our economy.

Offshore and onshore wind turbines generated a new high of 17.6 gigawatts of power on Monday afternoon, enough to power 3.5 million kettles, according to the Guardian. This represents nearly half (48.5%) of the electricity grid in England, Scotland and Wales, according to data from operator National Grid ESO, and beats the previous record of 17.5 GW set on 13 February 2021.

The average UK household requires around 3700 kWh of electricity per year and 12,000 kWh of gas. To help supply this, there are 8,600 onshore wind turbines and 3,000 offshore wind turbines in the UK.

The UK offshore wind sector generated enough green electricity for 39% /10.8 million of UK homes (40.7 TWh) in 2020, up from 30% (32TWh) in 2019.

Key insights into UK offshore wind sector

Aprils Powersystems NewsWatch sees The Crown Estate publish its ninth Offshore Wind Operational Report, which provides in-depth insight into the progress of the UK’s offshore wind sector. It paints a picture of a mature, robust and healthy market which is progressing at pace to deliver a strong and sustainable pipeline in support of the nation’s net zero ambitions.

In less than 20 years on from the first offshore wind farm being installed, the UK remains number one in the world for offshore wind installed capacity, with 14 GW of total capacity.

The  report also advises that the most significant change in 2020 was the shift in project status, with three large projects moving into the under-construction phase. Project capacity under construction increased by over 60% from 4.4GW to 7.2GW due to a final investment decision (FID) being reached on Dogger Bank A and B projects. This marked the start of construction on what will be the world’s largest offshore wind farm, a title currently held by Hornsea 1, which is located off the east coast of England and became the largest offshore wind farm in the world, capable of supplying energy needs of one million UK homes. The wind farm has a planned total capacity of up to 6 GW.  Dogger Bank is also furthest from shore at 130km off the North East English coast. The 1,050 MW Seagreen project also achieved FID in June and construction has started onshore for what is expected to be Scotland’s largest offshore wind farm. Recently RWE has committed to building its biggest ever wind farm off the UK coast after making a final investment decision on a £3bn 1.4-gigawatt offshore wind farm called Sofia.

The Government’s 2050 net zero ambitions, combined with its Ten Point Plan and Energy White Paper which set out an aspiration for the UK to achieve 40 GW of offshore wind by 2030, has helped fuel momentum in the sector.

Wind energy around the globe

The recently published Global Wind Report 2021 has found that the global wind power market has nearly quadrupled in size over the past decade with record growth in 2020 driven by a surge of installations in China and the US, together, the US and China installed 75% of new installations in 2020 and account for over half of the world’s total wind power capacity. Today, there is now 743 GW of wind power capacity worldwide.

The report shows that the current rate of wind power deployment will not be enough to achieve carbon neutrality by the middle of this century, and said “urgent action” must be taken by policymakers now to scale up wind power at the necessary pace.

Scenarios that have been established by international energy bodies such as IRENA and the IEA, state a minimum of 180 GW of new wind needs to be installed every year to limit global warming to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels, and will need to increase to 280 GW annually to maintain a pathway compliant with meeting net zero by 2050.

Current challenges in the wind energy market

As renewable energy grows, wind energy will become the backbone of energy systems in many parts of the world, requiring us to move beyond the focus on simply increasing wind energy capacity to instead instigating new collaborations with stakeholders across the global energy system to uncover more powerful policies and unlock greater investments to fuel the Sustainable Energy Transition.

  • This entails expanding our reach to cover key issues such as limited customers on the grid, grid build-out, storage, market redesign and accelerating the deployment of renewable energy to new sectors.
  • Red tape and antiquated planning and permitting systems are slowing down the Energy Transition all over the world – many countries share similar challenges in market design, where investment in wind energy is available but policy conditions undermine the viability of projects.
  • Primarily countries in the Global South, renewable energy uptake faces structural barriers, such as energy access shortfalls and affordability gaps in the power sector. Worldwide, 770 million people still lack electricity access, and this is set to shrink only moderately to 430 million people by 2030

A team to combat wind energy challenges

The Global Wind Energy Coalition for COP26 was launched in April to help governments deliver on their Net Zero targets through the scaling up of investment and wind programme ambitions. The campaign is being led by the Global Wind Energy Council and RenewableUK and will focus on the build up to COP26 in Glasgow:

  • Highlighting the role of wind power in decarbonisation
  • Developing wind energy acceleration plans with policymakers in key onshore and offshore wind markets
  • Building collaborations with other technologies and heavy industries that work towards system-wide decarbonisation in a global renewable energy alliance; and
  • Creating a global Sprint for Offshore Wind Ambition to support governments achieve the global 1,400 GW target by 2050 set by the Ocean Renewable Energy Action Coalition.

New enabling technologies

Large-scale wind penetration will require balancing and storage technologies to maintain a cost effective and secure transition. Hybrid renewable tenders with wind, solar and battery elements are now picking up around the world, but storage technologies will need to be competitive and scalable to disincentivise support of polluting and inflexible energy systems.

Concurrent to the transformation of infrastructure to enable grid interconnectivity and sector coupling, the production of green hydrogen as a key storage solution will need to be economically viable.

With hydrogen now playing a prominent role in national energy strategies, from Germany to Australia to Chile to South Korea, it is no longer meaningful to dismiss it as over-hyped. But it is worth examining the political and economic constraints of Power-to-X and green hydrogen to understand the degree to which they can accelerate the shift to carbon neutrality, and whether we are indeed headed towards the age of the “hydrogen economy”.

Of all renewable energies, offshore wind and wind/solar hybrid projects have the highest potential to improve the economics of green hydrogen projects due to cost competitiveness and scalability.

Wind energy the future for meeting business requirements 

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