Wind power capacity is expected to grow on average by 77GW a year from 2020

Wind power capacity is expected to grow on average by 77GW a year from 2020

Wind power capacity is expected to add 77GW every year this decade

Wind power capacity is expected to grow on average by 77GW a year from 2020 to 2029, representing a growth of 112%, according to new data from Wood Mackenzie,
The ‘Global Wind Power Market Outlook Update: Q1 2020’, found 62GW of wind capacity was added globally in 2019, a 23% increase from 2018 and the second-highest annual total after 2015, when the figure was 63GW.

Wood Mackenzie research director Luke Lewandowski said: “A policy-induced build frenzy in China and the US largely drove an 11.5GW uptick in 2019 global net capacity additions when compared with 2018. Significant contributions also came from Argentina, +676MW year-on-year (YoY), Mexico, +883MW YoY, Sweden, +720MW YoY and Spain, +1.9GW YoY.”

However, Wood Mackenzie said while the story for 2019 was a positive one, 2020 will not be so lucky.
The coronavirus is likely to impact the 150GW “bulge” in global wind capacity additions expected from 2020 to 2021, according to Wood Mackenzie’s report.
Lewandowski added: “Impact from the coronavirus is expected to exacerbate an already pressure-filled 27.5GW two-year build cycle in the US.
“As the production tax credit (PTC) fades, US offshore annual capacity additions will depend increasingly on state leadership. We expect this to yield 23.3GW over the 10-year outlook period.

“Annual additions in Latin America will average more than 4GW. Development of the free market in Brazil, the execution of inaugural auction awards in Colombia, the opportunity presented by coal retirements in Chile and an increasing demand from the commercial and industrial segment in Mexico will all contribute to a compound annual growth rate of 9% in the region from 2020 to 2029.”

Compliance with the EU’s energy and climate targets for 2030 will drive the addition of 225GW within Europe across the outlook period, according to Wood Mackenzie.
“Land constraints in mature countries will push a quarter of Europe’s growth offshore, where the sector will comprise 32% of additions in Western Europe and 43% of additions in Northern Europe from 2020 to 2029,” said Lewandowski.

Steady annual growth in the Middle East and Africa will result in a 10-year CAGR of 23%. Nearly 60% of the 48GW forecast for the sub-region is concentrated in Egypt, Saudi Arabia and South Africa.

Supply chain constraints and delays caused by the coronavirus will curtail near-term growth potential in China, yet developers will still manage to connect 26GW of wind power to the grid in 2020, the report found.

Across the 10-year outlook, Wood Mackenzie expects 250GW of wind power capacity to be brought online in China. Growth in the offshore sector and wind repowering opportunities will bolster onshore development.

The rest of Asia will add 107GW between 2020 and 2029. “Additions in India will account for 51% of new capacity, as the country works to comply with aggressive targets.

“Offshore demand in the rest of the sub-region will add 18GW – or approximately 35% of new capacity – over the outlook period,” added Lewandowski.

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How Much Offshore Wind Power Does the UK Need?

How Much Offshore Wind Power Does the UK Need?

How Much Offshore Wind Power Does the UK Need?

The UK government has indicated that it’s likely that the country will now require more offshore wind power than previously envisaged. The announcement, made by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS), came at the beginning of this month, exactly one year after the government launched its Offshore Wind Sector Deal with the industry.

The revised figures are down in large part to the government’s commitment to achieving its ambitious greenhouse gas targets, agreed upon last year. In June 2019, the UK became the first major economy in the world to enshrine into law a goal of net-zero greenhouse gas emissions before 2050. In order to meet that goal, it’s now expected that offshore wind (alongside other renewables) will have to pick up the slack from diminishing fossil fuel sources.

Building on solid foundations

At present, the UK currently has more offshore wind capacity than anywhere in the world, with 9.8GW of power generated by offshore facilities. While that might feel like a trifling amount compared to the 306.6TW of electricity consumed by Britons each day, every little helps towards reaching the net-zero carbon objective by 2050.

Plans are in the pipeline to increase that amount to 19.5GW by the middle of the current decade, while the 2050 target has already been increased once. In December last year, the government revealed that it would now be seeking to install 40GW of offshore wind power capacity by the halfway point of the millennium, rather than the 30GW which had been originally announced. Now, BEIS is saying that even the revamped figures might be too conservative.

Works in progress

Significant progress towards the government’s goals has already been made. Last year, Scotland’s largest offshore wind farm (Beatrice, in the Moray Firth) officially became operational and is now capable of providing 588MW of energy. Meanwhile, Hornsea One off the Yorkshire coast completed construction in October 2019 and is scheduled to open sometime this year. With 1,128MW of capacity, it will become the largest offshore wind farm in the world.

The Crown Estate has also opened a new round of leasing for a minimum of 7GW worth of projects in England and Wales, due to be completed this year. The Scottish Crown Estate is due to open their own round of leasing later in 2020, as well. These developments have been made possible, at least in part, due to the falling costs of wind energy; record low prices of £39.65/MW were bid last year, which is almost two-thirds lower than in 2015.

Innovating for the future

Not content to rest on those laurels, the government is also keen to instigate competition and raise productivity through a new £100 million Offshore Wind Growth Partnership (OWGP), which will oversee developments in the industry over the next decade. Involved in everything from advanced methods of lubricating turbines to shoring up the supply chain, the OWGP is expected to be instrumental in the industry’s ongoing prosperity.

Other innovations are also being investigated, as well. “The government will work with the sector and other stakeholders to build upon the strong foundations of this Sector Deal to accelerate sustainable deployment up to 2030,” said the latest report from BEIS. “We will also work with the sector to prepare for the 2030s and 2040s, for example by enabling new innovations such as floating offshore wind and hybrid projects.”

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Global wind energy capacity increased by over 60GW in 2019

Global wind energy capacity increased by over 60GW in 2019

Global wind energy capacity increased by over 60GW in 2019, making it the second highest year for new installations, according to a new report from the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC).

GWEC’s 15th edition of the ‘Global Wind Report’ said year-on-year growth in 2019 was 19%, with 60.4GW installed.

The main driver of growth was market-based mechanisms, with auctioned wind capacity in 2019 more than doubling on 2018 to over 40GW worldwide, the council said.

Most of the new capacity was in established markets, with the top five – comprising China, US, UK, India and Spain – accounting for 70%.
In terms of cumulative installations, China, US, Germany, India and Spain remain the top markets, making up 73% of the total 651GW of capacity across the world.

Asia Pacific was the global leader for new onshore wind installations in 2019, installing 28.1GW.

Europe saw 30% year-on-year onshore wind growth, despite a slump in Germany, driven by strong growth in Spain, Sweden and Greece, the report said.

Emerging markets in Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and South-East Asia showed moderate growth in 2019, with combined installations of 4.5GW.

Last year was a record year for offshore wind with 6.1GW installed.

The sector now accounts for 10% (29.1GW) of total wind installations globally, GWEC said.

Growth was led by China, which remains in the number-one position for new offshore capacity with 2.3GW installed.
The UK remains in the top spot in terms of cumulative capacity with 9.7GW.

GWEC said over 355GW of on- and offshore capacity will be added over the next five years, an average of about 71GW a year to the end of 2024, with offshore expanding its share to 20% by that time.

The report noted that its forecast will “undoubtedly be impacted by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, due to disruptions to global supply chains and project execution in 2020”.

But GWEC added that it is “too soon to predict the extent of the virus’s impact on the wider global economy and energy markets”.
It will publish an updated market outlook for 2020-2024 in the second quarter of 2020.

GWEC chief executive Ben Backwell said: “The wind energy sector is continuing to see consistent growth, after having unequivocally established itself as a cost-competitive energy source worldwide.

“Established market players such as China and the US accounted for nearly 60% of new installations, however, we see emerging markets in regions such as South East Asia, Latin America and Africa playing an increasingly important role in the years to come, while offshore wind is also becoming a significant growth driver.

“Nevertheless, we are still not where we need to be when it comes to the global energy transition and meeting our climate goals.

“If we are to have any chance at reaching our Paris Agreement objectives and remaining on a 1.5°C pathway, we need to be installing at least 100GW of wind energy annually over the next decade, and this needs to rise to 200GW annually post-2030 and beyond.

“To do this, we need to look past competitive LCOE alone, and ensure that regulation and market design is fit for purpose to support an accelerated rate of wind power installations.

“This will mean stronger measures to push incumbent fossil fuels off the grid and a shake-up of administrative structures and regulation to ensure we can go out and build.”

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The world’s biggest ever off-shore wind farm project at Doggerbank

The world’s biggest ever off-shore wind farm project at Doggerbank

The world’s biggest ever off-shore wind farm project at Doggerbank

Dogger Bank Wind Farm is a joint venture between SSE Renewables and Equinor (formerly Statoil) and is made up of three offshore wind farm sites in the North Sea: Creyke Beck a 1.2GW, Creyke Beck B (1.2GW) and Teeside A 1.2GW. All three sites were successful in the UK’s September 2019 Contracts for Difference (CfD) auctions.

Doggerbank is part of a submerged peninsula that once connected the British Isles to mainland Europe, has been designated as the site of the world’s biggest ever wind project. Generating enough power for 4.5 million homes, it will power 5% of the UK’s entire energy demand by 2025.

Alexandra Malone, Head of Corporate Affairs at SSE Renewables – speaking at Building the UK’s Energy Future Conference, said “We were quite lucky to be the biggest winner in the UK Government’s low-carbon auction”  The firm is developing the project in a JV with Equino.

Alongside this project, they will also be developing the largest off-shore wind project in Scotland, Malone said: “Our Sea Green wind farm which will take over from Beatrice as Scotland’s biggest wind farm will be able to power 1 million homes and bring great economic value to Scotland. It will add £1bn to the Scottish economy and support 500 construction jobs.”

Malone described the company’s strong green commitments: “We don’t have a strategy for sustainability, we have a sustainable business strategy. By 2030 we pledge to cut our carbon intensity by 50%, treble our renewables, enable electric vehicles and be a leader in fair wages and fair tax.”

SSE Renewables are also driving forward more on-shore wind projects, despite there being a slowdown in that sector, Malone explained: “There was only one on-shore farm built in 2019, but we will be taking forward an extension project at our Gordonbush farm.”

She expressed positivity that the Government had not pursued bans on on-shore wind despite their political contention.

Off-shore wind has been undergoing a game-changing price reduction in the UK, becoming one of if not the least expensive source of electricity, and Malone touted the “record low prices of £40 per mwhr, which is a 60% reduction in price.”

Will Apps, Head of Energy Development at The Crown Estate, attributed part of the cost decrease to an improvement in funding mechanisms: “Contracts for Different (CFDs), which work on a 15-year basis for these projects, has provided a competitive base to drive down the costs that we see.”

The Crown Estate is the public sector organisation responsible for licensing the rights for offshore generation, and Apps stressed the difficulty of finding locations for off-shore wind: “There is a very, very busy sea space, and finding the space for farms is not an easy task.”

Citing potential disruptions to shipping, fishing and impacts on navigation, Apps also noted the need to minimise natural disruption from the projects: “We have a biodiversity crisis on the scale of the climate emergency.”

David Parkin, Director of Progressive Energy, praised the success of carbon reduction as being the “first decoupling of emissions production and economic growth in human history” yet was still not on track to meet its 2050 carbon neutral targets.

Parkin said: “The Committee on Climate Change will say 80% of the hydrogen we need will be from blue hydrogen and 20% from green hydrogen which is from electrolysis of renewables. Others say 60-40, others say 50-50.”

They are combining hydrogen production and carbon capture and storage to remove 97% of carbon emissions produced through the use of gas to heat homes.

The North West Energy Cluster aims to be the UK’s first low carbon industrial cluster by the 2030s, to bid on a £132m government funding pot.

Emma Degg, Chief Executive of the North West Business Leadership Team, suggested that these industrial clusters represented the future: “There are two ways of decarbonising. We can either shut down industries or make sure our industries are fit the future.”

Wind and hydrogen provide exciting paths to decarbonisation, and whilst both have challenges to overcome, they will both play major roles in the UK’s energy future.

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Powersystems Announce Electrical Works Contract For Glen Kyllachy Onshore Wind Farm

Powersystems Announce Electrical Works Contract For Glen Kyllachy Onshore Wind Farm

Powersystems Announce Electrical Works Contract For Glen Kyllachy Onshore Wind Farm

Powersystems has announced it has been awarded the electrical balance of plant contract by Scottish company RJ Mcleod who are a highly experienced civils contractor based in Dingwall – who have been appointed to construct the 50MW Glen Kyllachy wind farm on behalf of their mutual client Innogy Renewables.

Experience in the design and installation of high voltage electrical infrastructure has placed Powersystems in a position ideally suited to carryout wind farm electrical balance of plant contracts.

Since Powersystems first wind farm installation at Goonhilly Downs in 1992 they have been actively involved with wind farm projects ranging from single turbines to 60 plus turbine sites. Powersystems engineers are experienced in the design, specification, installation and commissioning of wind farm switchgear, transformers, cable infrastructure, earth systems and SCADA cabling, enabling the complete installation to be carried out.

Powersystems have connected 24% of all U.K. land base wind farm generation.

In addition to the on-site electrical balance of plant works Powersystems can provide grid connections to wind farm sites, and have done so in some extremely remote and challenging locations – such as the construction on Glen Kyllachy Wind Farm, situated South of Inverness started in October 2019. Initial works focus on site establishment, installing the main access tracks and opening up the borrow pits.  In addition, the first of the crane hardstands at a wind turbine location has now been constructed.

The focus for the next few months will be to continue the access track construction, prepare the substation platform and undertake the construction of many of the crane hardstands.  In the Spring, RJ Mcleods will look to begin construction of the wind turbine foundations.

Scottish and Southern Energy Networks are continuing with their design and procurement process associated with the grid connection for the site and it is anticipated that they will commence works on site in the Summer.

Other activities taking place offsite include the confirmation of the contract for the supply and installation of the wind turbines with Nordex.  It is intended that these will be transported to site in March 2021.

This marks Powersystems  thirty second project with RJ McLeod.

Notes To Editors

Contact Information

This article is written by Jules Daly, Marketing and Communications Manager at Powersystems UK.

Email jules.daly@powersystemsuk.com Telephone 01454 318000

Powersystems UK Ltd are a specialist High Voltage electrical engineering company established in 1977.  Powersystems have grown by reputation to become a major force in the design and installation of high voltage infrastructure across the whole of the United Kingdom.As one of the first Lloyds National Electricity Registration Scheme ‘s accredited Independent Connection Providers we are capable of delivering contestable grid connections at voltages up to 132kV.

We have supported and delivered projects for diverse clientele; this includes:

  • Dyson Hullavington
  • Millbrook Proving Ground, electric vehicle testing facility
  • EV infrastructure, for bus transportation projects UK wide
  • Warner Bros Harry Potter Studio, London
  • Rolls Royce Aero Engines and Airbus
  • Jaguar Land Rover
  • Formula One Race Teams (Mercedes Petronas, Williams F1 and Red Bull Technologies)
  • Public Sector – Ministry of Defence, Universities, NHS Trusts UK wide, Schools, Water Utilities.
  • Bristol, Newport and Southampton Port Authorities

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Windy Rig construction keeps it local

Windy Rig construction keeps it local

Statkraft has announced it has awarded Scottish company RJ McLeod the contract to undertake the civil engineering works for the 43MW Windy Rig wind farm in Scotland.

Construction is expected to take around 16 months, with the project due to reach operational stage in 2021.

Ionic Consulting are supporting Statkraft as Owner’s Engineer during construction, with RJ McLeod completing the Civil Works and Powersystems UK providing the Electrical Works.

Windy Rig wind farm is a subsidy free project located in Dumfries & Galloway and was originally developed by Element Power (acquired by Statkraft in September 2018).

Statkraft UK Managing Director, David Flood said: “Windy Rig is our first subsidy-free wind project in the UK and is an exciting milestone for our company. This kicks off the start of a busy year across all sectors of our business.”

Barry Maher, Statkraft Project Manager for the work said: “We are delighted to be able to appoint such experienced Civil and Electrical contractors in RJMcLeod and Powersystems UK and are confident they will execute the works in and safe and timely manner with minimum impact on local residents. We will continue our engagement with local communities throughout the project and will promote the use of locally sourced resources and workforce.”

Jamie Corser, Business Development Manager at RJ McLeod said “This marks our fourth project working with Statkraft in Scotland and this contract takes us over 2750MW of onshore wind farms built or in construction. We look forward to working with Statkraft to deliver another successful project.”
Statkraft has agreed to transfer ownership of the project to Greencoat UK Wind post-construction, with Statkraft managing the construction and providing operational management services for the wind farm once the project is online.

Europe’s largest producer of renewable energy, Statkraft have stated plans to bring forward 600MW of renewable energy projects in the UK by 2025 with at least a further 600MW in development. The company acquired UK onshore wind development company Airvolution Clean Energy in August 2019 to boost its development pipeline.

This marks Powersystems UK’s fourth project with the Statkraft team, and are familiar partners for RJ McLeod, having worked together on over 30 projects.
Ionic Consulting recently completed their 7th project for Statkraft, this contract being their first Statkraft project in Scotland. Ionic opened their Edinburgh office in November 2018.

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